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Sep
24
comment Types of infinity
Thanks. Does this also mean that the cardinalities of all classes which include the class of infinities are equal, and greater than the cardinalities of all classes which don't include the class of infinities?
Sep
24
asked Types of infinity
Sep
22
comment If $x=1$, then its powers end with $1$
I don't think OP knows about modular arithmetic...
Sep
14
comment Why is $e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$ almost an integer?
accepted as answer for explaining how some numbers approach integers, albeit with a completely different example. I understand Rumanujan's Constant is way beyond my understanding of mathematics.
Sep
14
accepted Why is $e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$ almost an integer?
Sep
13
comment How do I map a spherical triangle to a plane triangle?
Maybe also interesting for gis.stackexchange.com?
Sep
13
asked Why is $e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$ almost an integer?
Sep
13
revised sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
deleted 59 characters in body
Sep
13
comment sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
This is the approach I followed too, but I had some trouble finding a second equation to get rid of the theta :-(
Sep
13
comment sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
accepted as answer for indeed looking nicer than your other solution.
Sep
13
accepted sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
Sep
12
revised sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
edited title; added 15 characters in body
Sep
12
revised sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
added 79 characters in body
Sep
12
asked sangaku - a geometrical puzzle
Sep
12
revised Boy Born on a Tuesday - is it just a language trick?
added 12 characters in body
Sep
12
comment Boy Born on a Tuesday - is it just a language trick?
@muad: there doesn't seem a mistake in your derivation; the error was in my intuition that the day couldn't possibly have anything to do with it.
Sep
12
revised Boy Born on a Tuesday - is it just a language trick?
added 209 characters in body
Sep
11
comment Do complex numbers really exist?
"When you first hear this, it sounds crazy." I must say, when I first saw it being drawn in the Argand plane, it made perfectly sense to me: you introduce an imaginary axis because your imaginary number obviously can fit nowhere on the real axis. If you say i = 1 rotated CW over 90°, then i*i = 1 rotated over 2*90°, and you've arrived at -1, back on the real axis! The Argand plane made it all clear to me. Unfortunately I have no such representation for quaternions :-(
Sep
11
answered Do complex numbers really exist?
Sep
11
comment Liouville's number revisited
I guess I should have said "Liouville's constant" instead of "Liouville's number".