740 reputation
1721
bio website stevenvh.net/steven.php
location Flanders, Belgium
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Apr 1 at 9:38

That's "Steven" (with the "n" at the end)


"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." — Bertrand Russell


Product designer, consumer electronics: audio (with Philips), home automation.
Done computer science in a previous life too.


Belbin team roles: Plant and Resource Investigator


Personal values: respect, honesty, pride, modesty, fairness


I yell because I care


favorite candy


Apr
4
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
30
comment How to explain Real Big Numbers?
@user136774 - That's why I say for most practical purposes. I remember a quote by a professor: "In theory the summation goes to infinity, but in practice infinity is five." When was the last time you needed Graham's Number in a real-life application? Or even 10^20?
Mar
28
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
23
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
22
accepted What are these sets of Pythagorean triples called?
Jan
11
asked What are these sets of Pythagorean triples called?
Jan
9
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
22
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
29
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
7
awarded  Yearling
Feb
19
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
23
comment I have learned that 1/0 is infinity, why isn't it minus infinity?
@millimoose - No, $\infty$ isn't a real number, I never said it was. But you can extend the reals to include $\infty$, that's the hyperreals, and then you can define operations which include reals and $\infty$. (Probably not a ring like I claimed earlier; none of the 4 basic operation has an inverse for $\infty$.)
Dec
22
comment I have learned that 1/0 is infinity, why isn't it minus infinity?
@millimoose - The conclusion is correct inasmuch the limit can't be defined if left and right limit are different. That does not imply that it would be defined if they are equal. And $\infty$ + $\infty$ is $\infty$, by definition. $\infty$ is not a number, but that doesn't mean you can't define a ring for it. And operations with reals, like $\infty$ + r = $\infty$. The fact that $\infty$ + $\infty$ = $\infty$ is the reason why $\infty$ - $\infty$ is not defined; you can't find a result which is consistent with the definition for addition.
Dec
21
comment I have learned that 1/0 is infinity, why isn't it minus infinity?
@millimoose - Sorry, I still don't agree. lim(1/x^2) for x->0 is defined: it's +infinity. That may not be a number in R, but it has a defined symbol, for which a limited number of operations are defined. Like infinity + infinity = infinity, but infinity - infinity is not defined. lim(1/x) on the other hand has no defined value, not in R, nor + or -infinity. That's undefined, which is different from + or -infinity.
Dec
19
comment I have learned that 1/0 is infinity, why isn't it minus infinity?
@millimoose - Not sure that's correct. For instance for 1/x^2 both the left limit and right limit for x -> 0 are +infinity. Then the limit is +infinity, so defined.
Dec
19
comment I have learned that 1/0 is infinity, why isn't it minus infinity?
IEEE-754 doesn't have to give infinity as the result of 1/0; it has a type "NaN" (Not a Number) for these cases.
Oct
18
answered general form of difference equation
Oct
18
revised general form of difference equation
formatting, LaTeX
Oct
18
suggested suggested edit on general form of difference equation