7,962 reputation
22150
bio website
location College Station, TX
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago


Jul
12
awarded  Good Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jun
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
17
comment How to show that $\int \limits_{-\infty}^{\infty} (t^2+1)^{-s} dt = \pi^{1/2} \frac{ \Gamma(s-1/2)}{\Gamma(s)}$
Thank you Lucian, it worked perfectly.
Jun
17
accepted How to show that $\int \limits_{-\infty}^{\infty} (t^2+1)^{-s} dt = \pi^{1/2} \frac{ \Gamma(s-1/2)}{\Gamma(s)}$
Jun
17
asked How to show that $\int \limits_{-\infty}^{\infty} (t^2+1)^{-s} dt = \pi^{1/2} \frac{ \Gamma(s-1/2)}{\Gamma(s)}$
May
28
comment Given $f:(0,\infty ) \to \mathbb{R}$ Can we say that $\lim_{x\to \infty} f(x)$ exists?
I would guess that by saying does "finite $\implies$ $f$ is bounded"?, the OP means to ask if it is the case that having a finite limit when $x \rightarrow \infty$ implies that $f$ is bounded on $(0,\infty)$. But this is just a guess.
Apr
23
answered A question of algebraic geometry applied to field theory
Apr
13
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
8
comment Roots of Unity: Sums, Products, and Field Extensions
@kevin Dear kevin, I added some more detail to my first hint.
Apr
8
revised Roots of Unity: Sums, Products, and Field Extensions
added 346 characters in body
Apr
8
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
8
answered Roots of Unity: Sums, Products, and Field Extensions
Apr
4
revised Let $t$ be a transcendental number. Prove that the set $\{(a+bt) \mid a,b \in \mathbb{Q}\}$ is not a number field.
edited title
Apr
4
answered Let $t$ be a transcendental number. Prove that the set $\{(a+bt) \mid a,b \in \mathbb{Q}\}$ is not a number field.
Mar
22
answered Prove that the Galois group of $x^n-1$ is abelian over the rationals
Mar
18
comment Calculating the divisors of the coordinate functions on an elliptic curve
Dear Alvaro, thank you so much for this very detailed and clearly explained answer. I really appreciate your help.
Mar
17
comment Calculating the divisors of the coordinate functions on an elliptic curve
Dear Alvaro, can you please explain why the function $\dfrac{X-e_1Z}{Z} = \dfrac{Y^2}{(X-e_2Z)(X-e_3Z)}$ has a double pole at $[0,1,0]$? I'm studying from Silverman's book and according to his definitions in page 18, I found a uniformizer at $[0,1,0]$ to be $x= \dfrac{X}{Y}$, but then it is not clear to me how to prove that the above rational function is in the ideal $M_{[0,1,0]}^{-2} = \langle x^{-2} \rangle_{K[E]_{[0,1,0]}}$
Mar
4
awarded  Popular Question