Reputation
1,148
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
2 14
Impact
~11k people reached

May
25
revised Hypergeometric function variance
formatting
May
25
suggested approved edit on Hypergeometric function variance
May
23
comment How do I figure out how many snacks to put in a vending machine each day, given a function that predicts how many will be sold in one instant?
To be clear, do you intend for your example to be a better example of a discrete operation approximated by a continuous function? Cos I didn't notice that the first time I read your response. (And the first sentence sorta primed me to not read it that way.)
May
23
comment How do I figure out how many snacks to put in a vending machine each day, given a function that predicts how many will be sold in one instant?
I mean, sure, but would it cease to be inappropriate if OP were selling, I don't know, newspapers? The premise was that the function existed; presumably it does what it's supposed to do. (I'm guessing OP was speaking hypothetically, of course.) If the function tells us what we want it to, why not? Since OP wrote that he/she was learning, I simply wanted to point out that using a continuous function to model a discrete operation isn't on its face an invalid method.
May
23
comment How do I figure out how many snacks to put in a vending machine each day, given a function that predicts how many will be sold in one instant?
It's not at all uncommon to use continuous functions to approximate discrete-valued functions; often it simplifies matters a great deal.
May
23
comment How do I figure out how many snacks to put in a vending machine each day, given a function that predicts how many will be sold in one instant?
That's correct, at least in the case of a definite integral (meaning we evaluate our antiderivative at the endpoints of the interval and find the difference).
May
23
comment How do I figure out how many snacks to put in a vending machine each day, given a function that predicts how many will be sold in one instant?
You'd need to integrate the function over a given interval (say, one day). Have you gotten that far in your studies yet?
May
4
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
23
comment Minimal polynomials and cyclic subspaces
@JeremyDaniel: I almost said no. The eigenvectors are $v_1$ and $v_2$, and we can't get from one to the other. Then I had a look at $v_1 + v_2$; its image is linearly independent. And so if by "cyclic" we mean the whole space is generated by one vector, then I think this proves it is :). The problem is, I'm not sure why I chose that linear combination besides the fact that I've seen similar choices made before. As for why one does that, no idea. In particular, the connection between what I just did and the eigenvectors eludes me. Can you recommend a source, online or otherwise?
Nov
23
comment Minimal polynomials and cyclic subspaces
@Timbuc: Thanks for the hint. Are you saying, for example, that $V$ might be written as a direct sum of, say, two cyclic subspaces, but that one of those subspaces might be contained in the other?
Nov
23
revised Minimal polynomials and cyclic subspaces
Made headline more precise
Nov
23
asked Minimal polynomials and cyclic subspaces
Oct
21
comment If $f$ is increasing, then for all $n\in\mathbb{N}$ there exists $P_n$ : $U(f,P)-L(f,P) \leq (b-a)/n$
@Did: Second response: As someone who almost went for a linguistics degree before he went for a math degree, there's something kinda annoying about that :). (See this.) Granted, I have a constant times $n$, but it's not $n$. I assume, in general, it's impossible to do with $1\cdot n$?
Oct
21
comment If $f$ is increasing, then for all $n\in\mathbb{N}$ there exists $P_n$ : $U(f,P)-L(f,P) \leq (b-a)/n$
@Did: Thought about this on the ride home from work. First of two responses: I think I see where you're heading. Let $D = \lfloor f(b) - f(a) \rfloor + 1$. Define $P_n = \{ a + i((b-a)/Dn) : 0 \leq i \leq Dn \}$. Then everything seems to work out.
Oct
21
asked If $f$ is increasing, then for all $n\in\mathbb{N}$ there exists $P_n$ : $U(f,P)-L(f,P) \leq (b-a)/n$
Oct
19
comment For groups and orders show $\forall a,b\in G: |ab|=|ba|$ and $\forall G$ with $|G| = p^n$ for $p$ prime has a subgroup of order $p$
@user149868, Apologies, apparently I got some wires crossed when I was answering the second portion. I've gone ahead and deleted that part, since it wasn't helpful. But to answer your question: If $|G|=p$, it is indeed cyclic. If $|G|=p^n$, though, it need not be cyclic; for example, $|V_4|=2^2$ and $|D_8|=2^3$, but neither is cyclic.
Oct
19
revised For groups and orders show $\forall a,b\in G: |ab|=|ba|$ and $\forall G$ with $|G| = p^n$ for $p$ prime has a subgroup of order $p$
deleted the nonsense
Oct
16
answered For groups and orders show $\forall a,b\in G: |ab|=|ba|$ and $\forall G$ with $|G| = p^n$ for $p$ prime has a subgroup of order $p$
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer