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seen Jan 6 '12 at 1:07

Oct
13
comment Comparing Powers of Different Bases
Thanks once again for the explanation @ArturoMagidin
Oct
13
accepted Comparing Powers of Different Bases
Oct
12
comment Comparing Powers of Different Bases
@ArturoMagidin I know :-) But which one is bigger: $2^{2000}$ or $10^{800}$? I'd like to know about cases like this one. Edit: You should post this edit in your comment as answer.
Oct
12
asked Comparing Powers of Different Bases
Oct
12
accepted Homework with logarithms
May
12
comment Homework with logarithms
Very clever! Well, following the idea $\log_{c}2 = 1$ (if I'm not mistaken), but unfortunately I've just checked the workbook answers (answers are provided, resolutions not) and it should be 4, not 11. Hmm, probably there is something wrong with the exercise. I'll search for my teacher tomorrow in school and ask him about this exercise. Thanks a lot you all, I'll post any news. cc @Isaac @GEdgar @Nana
May
12
comment Homework with logarithms
A lot easier… Thanks for pointing it out Nana.
May
12
comment Homework with logarithms
@Isaac, thanks. I was also thinking that could be no apparent solution, but know @GEdgar and @Skatche proposals are clarifying some aspects. The source book is really vague. I'll check the answer — I guess there is an error with this exercise.
May
11
asked Homework with logarithms
May
4
comment Simplifying a Trigonometric Expression
Thank you Joe. I ended up marking the other answer as correct, as it shows the complete solution. I hope you understand! But your explanation was certainly helpful, it was the kind of answer I was waiting. I'm sure I'd continue and find the solution after reading it. Thanks again! Best wishes
May
4
comment Simplifying a Trigonometric Expression
Well, thank you a lot Nicolas! What else can I say?
May
4
accepted Simplifying a Trigonometric Expression
May
4
asked Simplifying a Trigonometric Expression
Mar
30
comment Is this a kind of Permutation?
+1, thanks for your answer sir, and for providing the useful links.
Mar
30
comment Is this a kind of Permutation?
Thanks a lot for your comprehensive answer. Math is such a beautiful thing! Tuples is a new term for me. Most of the others I started to remember from school, but it was really useful to read this here as my primary education was not in english, and I'm now having to relearn many terms. If I may answer the questions, the first for the $k$-permutation would be $\frac{n!}{(n-k)!}$, or something like that, right? The $n$-permutation is easy: $n!$. Now, I'm not quite sure if I can convince myself why there are no $n+1$-permutations. Does $n+1$ relates to the set, without sufficient elements?
Mar
30
awarded  Scholar
Mar
30
awarded  Supporter
Mar
30
accepted Is this a kind of Permutation?
Mar
30
awarded  Student
Mar
30
asked Is this a kind of Permutation?