9,051 reputation
41647
bio website vimeo.com/cculter
location Seattle, WA
age 31
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen 45 mins ago

I'm a software developer at Microsoft, working on computer vision! Outside of work, I'm interested in the inverse problem: visualization of interesting structures, such as topological groups and music. I have a soft spot for dynamical systems, including celestial mechanics and dynamical billiards.


20h
revised Example of non-Abelian group with 4, 5, or 6 elements of order 2
describe question in title
Jan
17
comment Has anyone established an upper bound for the least integer $k$ such that infinitely many primes have at most $k$ ones in their binary representation?
@JaycobColeman I think that comment means that there exists at least one such prime for all sufficiently large $n$, not that there are infinitely many such primes.
Jan
17
comment Has anyone established an upper bound for the least integer $k$ such that infinitely many primes have at most $k$ ones in their binary representation?
@JaycobColeman That's a really interesting paper! I might be reading it wrong, but I don't think it proves the desired result. In Theorem 1.1, it's not immediately obvious how the estimate behaves for fixed $k$ (in their notation) and increasing $x$. At the end of the first section, the authors mention that their method doesn't help to bound tail distributions that are even broader than the count you're looking for.
Jan
16
comment Has anyone established an upper bound for the least integer $k$ such that infinitely many primes have at most $k$ ones in their binary representation?
This seems to be open; see the related question Are There Primes of Every Hamming Weight? - MathOverflow
Jan
15
answered Do 'symmetric integers' have some other name?
Dec
26
revised Fibonacci / Lucas Numbers Relationship: $F_{2n} = F_n L_n$
put formula in title
Dec
23
comment $\pi$ in terms of $4$?
@FelixMarin The C++ code writes SVG markup to the standard output, including the strings "red", "green", and "blue". From there, it's up to an SVG viewer to interpret the color names. I used Adobe Illustrator to export the SVG to JPG so that I could upload it here.
Dec
21
comment Is there a logic to formalize the concept of “understanding”
Is justification close enough to understanding?
Dec
19
comment If $x$ and $y$ are not both $0$ then $ x^2 +xy +y^2> 0$
Almost the same question: math.stackexchange.com/questions/920605/inequality-x2y2xy-ge-0
Dec
19
revised If $x$ and $y$ are not both $0$ then $ x^2 +xy +y^2> 0$
describe problem in title
Dec
16
answered A limit with an intuitive and wrong answer
Dec
16
answered Can there be a bijection between a countably infinite set and an uncountably infinite set?
Dec
15
comment Relations on the set of Real Numbers
That's my answer: $\leq$ is transitive and reflexive, but not symmetric.
Dec
15
comment Relations on the set of Real Numbers
If someone else were to claim that $\sim$ is reflexive, they would be claiming that $x\sim x$ for ALL $x$. If you want to prove them wrong -- if you want to prove that $\sim$ is NOT reflexive, then you just have to prove the negation $x\not\sim x$ for ONE $x$. In your case, $0\not\sim 0$, since $0\neq0^2+1$.
Dec
15
comment Relations on the set of Real Numbers
Sure! You might want to be more explicit with the "mostly" part, by producing particular examples. To prove that $\sim$ is not reflexive, observe that $0\not\sim0$, and so on.
Dec
15
answered Relations on the set of Real Numbers
Dec
15
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
15
comment Help with difficult telescoping series question
Sounds good to me!
Dec
15
comment Help with difficult telescoping series question
Okay, then how about $(1/2!-1/3!)+(1/3!-1/4!)+\cdots+(1/2011!-1/2012!)$?