173 reputation
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location Florida
age 25
visits member for 1 year, 5 months
seen Dec 18 at 6:54

Dec
17
awarded  Caucus
Sep
29
comment Does this graph operation have a name? Subgraph join?
The motivation behind naming it a "subgraph join" was that the definition is similar to that of a graph join (second definition at this link en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graph_operations#Binary_operations), nevertheless what you said is a good point I'll keep in mind.
Sep
27
awarded  Student
Sep
27
comment Decimal expansion of a Cauchy sequence
This is pretty close, but I would specifically like to have $b_n$ represent decimal truncations of $a=\lim_{n\to\infty} a_n$. Also sorry for the really late response.
Sep
27
revised Decimal expansion of a Cauchy sequence
clarified the property that $b_n$ was supposed to have.
Sep
27
comment Does this graph operation have a name? Subgraph join?
In the second bullet I specify that the edge set is in general not just the union of the edge sets of A and B. For example if I have the the square $C_4$ and A,B,C,D are the subgraphs corresponding to each of the four vertices in clockwise order, then $A+B$ has 1 edge but $A+C=A\cup C$ and so has no edges.
Sep
27
revised Decimal expansion of a Cauchy sequence
Clarified what I meant by "determining an equivalent Cauchy sequence which corresponds to a decimal expansion"
Sep
27
revised Does this graph operation have a name? Subgraph join?
Grammer and notation clean-up
Jan
8
comment $gcd(a,b)$ in a UFD subring is not a greatest common divisor in the ring
I don't understand your wording. What is the proposition to which you desire a counterexample. For example, could you phrase your question as "Give a counterexample to the following proposition... (proposition here)..."
Dec
5
asked Decimal expansion of a Cauchy sequence
Dec
5
comment Prove that x has two base p decimal expansions
Check this answer out math.stackexchange.com/questions/271118/…
Nov
25
awarded  Tumbleweed
Nov
18
asked Does this graph operation have a name? Subgraph join?
Nov
18
answered What's the name for this sort of join?
Nov
13
comment Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
No worries. Glad I can help. If you find any mistakes later, let me know so that I can fix it and others can use the correct answer.
Nov
12
comment Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
No problem. It's good practice for me too. I've expanded on what I said earlier and just did all three parts. Also, note that for your comment $P(R|D)\neq \frac{P(A,G,D,R)}{P(D)}$ but instead $P(R|D)=\frac{P(R,D)}{P(D)}$. Oh and if you like my answer, feel free to upvote it as well :)
Nov
12
revised Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
Expanded on what I had said before
Nov
12
revised Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
12
answered Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
Nov
4
comment Prove that at a party with at least two people, there are two people who know the same number of people…
In the original question it was stated as an assumption that the minimum number of friends is 1 by the statement "given that every person at the party knows at least one person". It's possible to prove the same claim without that assumption, but since I was free to use it, I did.