168 reputation
8
bio website
location Florida
age 25
visits member for 1 year, 1 month
seen Aug 26 at 5:44

Jan
8
comment $gcd(a,b)$ in a UFD subring is not a greatest common divisor in the ring
I don't understand your wording. What is the proposition to which you desire a counterexample. For example, could you phrase your question as "Give a counterexample to the following proposition... (proposition here)..."
Dec
5
asked Decimal expansion of a Cauchy sequence
Dec
5
comment Prove that x has two base p decimal expansions
Check this answer out math.stackexchange.com/questions/271118/…
Nov
25
awarded  Tumbleweed
Nov
18
asked Does this graph operation have a name? Subgraph join?
Nov
18
answered What's the name for this sort of join?
Nov
13
comment Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
No worries. Glad I can help. If you find any mistakes later, let me know so that I can fix it and others can use the correct answer.
Nov
12
comment Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
No problem. It's good practice for me too. I've expanded on what I said earlier and just did all three parts. Also, note that for your comment $P(R|D)\neq \frac{P(A,G,D,R)}{P(D)}$ but instead $P(R|D)=\frac{P(R,D)}{P(D)}$. Oh and if you like my answer, feel free to upvote it as well :)
Nov
12
revised Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
Expanded on what I had said before
Nov
12
revised Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
12
answered Bayesian Network - unclear homework example
Nov
4
comment Prove that at a party with at least two people, there are two people who know the same number of people…
In the original question it was stated as an assumption that the minimum number of friends is 1 by the statement "given that every person at the party knows at least one person". It's possible to prove the same claim without that assumption, but since I was free to use it, I did.
Sep
24
awarded  Excavator
Sep
24
revised How are the sum and product of root formulas derived?
there was a typo on the 5th line: $a_0$ needed to be $a_n$
Sep
24
suggested suggested edit on How are the sum and product of root formulas derived?
Sep
20
comment How to show this
@Joanie Well that is an ambiguous case since you could also say the angle is $\pi$
Sep
20
answered How to verify a distribution is normalized?
Sep
19
answered Questions about limit points
Jul
27
comment Structure of topological spaces in terms of sequences
@Johan Would this be related to what you are looking for? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequential_space
Jul
27
comment Structure of topological spaces in terms of sequences
@Johan What do you mean how sequences relate to subsets? The image of a sequence of points in $X$ is a subset of $X$. What other relationship are you looking for? To me it seems that the first question is trivial, and the second is not worded properly.