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Mar
28
comment General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
@Garet - Older math textbooks (particularly if they're aimed at juniors/seniors/grad students) are more in-line with what you'd see in an RFC. They're often very short books (eg, I have a book on complex analysis that's about 70 pages long, but it covers most of the material you'd see in a typical complex analysis class). I'm not overly fond of the style. As with programming books, I like to see a lot of examples. But, that might not be a bad place to look if that's what you want.
Mar
26
comment General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
@Myself: That was a response to you, not him.
Mar
26
comment General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
Yikes. No more late-night posting for me. I deleted the first two because they had nothing to do with responding to your comment.
Mar
26
comment General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
or string the ideas together into a coherent and correct proof.
Mar
26
comment General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
My point is it isn't just some set of axioms and rules. It IS a language with a logical flow or rhythm. If sentence words threw I order any did, I together a in then the sentence wouldn't be readable to you. The same thing is true in math. Just because you know the words and symbols doesn't mean you know how to string them together in a manner that is readable.
Mar
25
answered Is there a geometric interpretation of the exponential function of real numbers?
Mar
25
revised General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
added 2531 characters in body
Mar
25
revised General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
added 103 characters in body
Mar
25
answered General Introduction to Functional and other Mathematic Notations
Mar
24
answered Solving project selection with a network flow algorithm
Mar
23
revised What do $\pi$ and $e$ stand for in the normal distribution formula?
added 537 characters in body
Mar
23
awarded  Supporter
Mar
23
revised The phrase “coordinate-wise” and its meaning
deleted 1796 characters in body
Mar
23
awarded  Teacher
Mar
22
revised What do $\pi$ and $e$ stand for in the normal distribution formula?
added 2 characters in body
Mar
22
answered What do $\pi$ and $e$ stand for in the normal distribution formula?
Mar
22
comment The phrase “coordinate-wise” and its meaning
So, another potential interpretation of that, it sounds like, is you can apply a function $f: \Re^1 \mapsto \Re^1$ coordinate-wise to a matrix or array by applying it element-wise.
Mar
22
awarded  Scholar
Mar
22
accepted The phrase “coordinate-wise” and its meaning
Mar
22
comment The phrase “coordinate-wise” and its meaning
Ah. I see your point. So, if for example I have a scalar function $\sigma$ I want to apply to the elements of a vector/matrix (eg, $\mathbf{Y} = \mathbf{\sigma}(\mathbf{X})$ ), I could say $\mathbf{\sigma}$ is evaluated "coordinate-wise" on elements of $\mathbf{x}$. You should write up your response as an answer so I can accept it.