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Apr
21
comment The 9 Billion Names of God
Although this is an interesting experience, the format of your question is very open-ended. There's no way anyone can give a 'right' answer, and often no answer is selected to be accepted for open-ended questions.
Apr
20
comment Maximization of Two Areas — Calculus 1
I'm a little unsure how to pull this off without another constraint. It seems like a circle is the most efficient shape in terms of containing the most area, so any expression you come up with would force the square's perimeter to zero and give you a circle with circumference = 10 meters.
Apr
19
comment how do you solve $y''+2y'-3y=0$?
@night - That notation is not at all uncommon. I've encountered it in 3 texts for undergrad study, and it's one of the most useful techniques discussed in the differential equations "Problem Solvers" book -- with plenty of examples given, albeit more awkwardly typed.
Apr
12
comment Genetic Algorithms
The next step will be to choose something you want to encode for the algorithm to work with. The two most obvious (only?) things you can model (or use to model) are actions to take within the game, and current/previous game state/actions. One way to handle it could be to use your genetic sequence to weight how important information is about current/previous game states and previous moves, then use some type of weighted sum to determine future moves. The paper you linked to probably describes the encoding they used.
Apr
8
awarded  Critic
Apr
8
comment Rules of Division
@Bill - Well put.
Apr
8
comment Rules of Division
@Bill - No. You made a good argument for a more general treatment of the topic. I'm arguing that there should be a "simplified" treatment as well. My point about the math jargon was to make the point that it doesn't need to be only readable by someone who has a desire to invest themselves in math enough to understand the more general/rigorous treatment.
Apr
8
comment Rules of Division
@Bill - That's an excellent point, but in this case the OP needed it for the GRE. One of the more frustrating things for me 'growing up' in math was trying to digest material in Mathworld and Wikipedia math entries -- mostly because they were loaded with math jargon I was unfamiliar with. If someone's studying for the GRE, they shouldn't have to know a lot of math jargon just to learn a couple of divisibility tests.
Apr
8
comment Rules of Division
@Bill - An answer is an answer. If original content was the requirement, most answers would be illegitimate because in most cases people would be quoting from, or regurgitating material from another source -- often without credit given.
Apr
8
comment Rules of Division
+1, I was tempted to down-vote because the motivation behind stackexchange-like sites -- at least, based on the FAQs I've read -- is to become something like Wikipedia, but designed in such a way to motivate people to more proactively contribute content. Wikipedia doesn't just contain external links, they actually provide content. If the link was to some message forum or some other site that didn't have a high likelihood of long-term survival, I probably would've down-voted.
Apr
6
comment $\ln(x^2)$ vs $2\ln x$
@Americo - That's only true for real $x$. $(a + b i)^2 = a^2 + a b i - b^2$, whereas $|a + b i|^2 = \sqrt{(a + b i)(a - b i)}^2 = \sqrt{a^2 + b^2}^2 = a^2 + b^2$. The two are not the same.
Apr
5
answered What are good books to learn graph theory?
Apr
5
comment Relation between complex Jacobian and differential of a complex number
I don't see the question. J is a gradient operator, and it appears the author is stating (not claiming or ignoring a proof for) that the jacobian matrix is $J\{e^{i \phi(u,v)}\} = f'(u + iv)$ -- which is a matrix of 1st derivatives w/respect to each variable. The ambiguity I see is in the definition of $f'(.)$; is it the derivative with respect to the single complex variable $z = u + i v$?
Apr
1
comment Help with summing a power series
@Mitch - ${-n \choose k} = (-1)^{k}{{k - (n + 1)} \choose k}$, for positive $n$. The $(-1)^{k}$ coefficient keeps the value of the quantity positive (provided $n > k$?). Ignoring sign, this is the number of ways to arrange $|k - (n + 1)|$ items taken $k$ at a time. The $\frac{1}{2}$ I don't have a great intuitive description for, sorry.
Apr
1
comment Help with summing a power series
@Mitch - The negative value is talked about in the wikipedia link I'm about to link to. The non-integer values could be covered by the interpretation $n! = \Gamma(n+1)$ -- though I'll confess, I don't know if there are any technicalities I'm missing with that blanket statement about non-integer $n$. Wikipedia link to binomial coefficients: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Apr
1
comment Help with summing a power series
@Mitch - I suppose that's one interpretation. I see the stackexchange-style sites as a far more global resource. While the answer may only serve the OP by doing his homework for him, this isn't an IRC chat-room or newsgroup post where a small audience will get something out of the response.
Apr
1
comment Help with summing a power series
@Mitch - If you don't like the question, downvote it. If you think the answer given is badly written or contains errors, downvote it. But this is just not classy.
Apr
1
awarded  Commentator
Apr
1
comment Help with summing a power series
It looks like answers are being downvoted as well for, it would seem, no good reason. If you think the questioner is being lazy, fine, but downvoting an answer because you don't think the question deserves an answer is extremely rude. If you downvote, at least provide a reasonable critique.
Mar
31
suggested rejected edit on Representing Ternary as Binary: Probability that the first $n$ bits are all zero