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1d
reviewed Approve Find the coordinate of a tetrahedron knowing all side lengths
1d
revised Finding a solution to $\sum _{n=1}^{n=k} \frac{1}{n^x}+\sum _{n=1}^{n=k} \frac{1}{n^y}=0$
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1d
comment Formula for sequence $0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1,\ldots$
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Feb
5
awarded  Socratic
Jan
30
reviewed Approve Trying to understand the function $y = x^x$
Jan
30
reviewed Approve Characterization of non-isomorphic graphs but isomorphic total graphs?
Jan
28
comment Are the solutions to $1+1/2^s+1/3^s=0$ known?
But yes if you could reproduce the zeros from Borweins paper so that I can compare them to my zeros I would be thankful.
Jan
28
comment Are the solutions to $1+1/2^s+1/3^s=0$ known?
I am trying to find the form of the iterative formula I am using. And with the help of the Online-Encyclopedia of Integer Sequence I found a sequence by Clark Kimberling that describes the form of the iteration in terms of $\frac{2 i(\pi ) \lfloor \text{kk} \exp (1)-1\rfloor }{\log (k)}$ and $\frac{2 i(\pi ) \lfloor \text{kk} \exp (1)-2\rfloor }{\log (k)}$. They serves as each others complements. I don't yet find all zeros this way but I think it is partial progress. I have not yet studied other root finding algorithms thouroughly. I always like study so that it relates to what I already know.
Jan
28
revised Are the solutions to $1+1/2^s+1/3^s=0$ known?
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Jan
28
revised Are the solutions to $1+1/2^s+1/3^s=0$ known?
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Jan
24
revised Is this similarity to the Fourier transform of the von Mangoldt function real?
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Jan
24
comment Can the Riemann hypothesis be relaxed to say that this matrix A consists of square roots?
I truncated like this: $\Lambda(n) = \begin{cases} \log q & \text{if }n=1, \\\log p & \text{if }n=p^k \text{ for some prime } p \text{ and integer } k \ge 1, \\ 0 & \text{otherwise.} \end{cases}$ or sometimes like this: $\Lambda(n) = \begin{cases} H_q & \text{if }n=1, \\\log p & \text{if }n=p^k \text{ for some prime } p \text{ and integer } k \ge 1, \\ 0 & \text{otherwise.} \end{cases}$ so the first term is $\log q$ or $H_q$= q-th harmonic number. Where $q$ is the number of terms of the von Mangoldt function used in the discrete fourier transform. I don't know what the first term should be.
Jan
24
comment Can the Riemann hypothesis be relaxed to say that this matrix A consists of square roots?
I know that $\sum_{k=1}^\infty \frac{T(1,k)}{k}$, but when taking the Fourier transform of the von Mangoldt function defined this way, I believe that a good choice is to truncate it: $\sum_{k=1}^{k=n} \frac{T(1,k)}{k}$ with $n$ equal to the number of von Mangoldt function terms used in the Fourier transform. This because then the spectra like plot will be zero at locations of zeta zeros. Or at least it looks like the plot is zero at zeta zeros.
Jan
24
revised Can the Riemann hypothesis be relaxed to say that this matrix A consists of square roots?
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Jan
24
comment New largest prime number discovery - what's all the fuss
@AlexL A recurrences for the primes that is possible to program in a spreadsheet without any number theoretic software at all can be found in my answer here: math.stackexchange.com/a/164829/8530 You don't even need the modulo function if you program it in Microsoft Office Excel. So in that sense there are as you say simple algorithms to find primes (all of them) but the computational cost is enormous and it requires to generate all the prime from 1 to n.
Jan
24
revised Inverting a matrix with determinants?
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Jan
24
comment Can the Riemann hypothesis be relaxed to say that this matrix A consists of square roots?
Thank you for the comment. I have tried to improve the question now as you suggested.
Jan
24
revised Can the Riemann hypothesis be relaxed to say that this matrix A consists of square roots?
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Jan
24
revised Can the Riemann hypothesis be relaxed to say that this matrix A consists of square roots?
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Jan
24
comment Are the primes found as a subset in this sequence $a_n$?
Related:math.stackexchange.com/questions/156035/…