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bio website numericalrecipes.wordpress.co…
location San Diego, CA
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen May 7 at 5:50

A mechanical engineer by education, I'm currently working for HP's Large Format Printing Specialty Printing Systems Advanced Platforms Group in Barcelona, Spain, San Diego, CA, dealing mostly with printing algorithms computer vision firmware.


Jan
14
awarded  Editor
Jan
14
revised Vectors and Loci of points
added 1 characters in body
Jan
14
answered Solving $C_1=4y^2+(y')^2+8y$
Jan
14
answered Vectors and Loci of points
Jan
13
answered What is the probability that the 2002 mean salary of a random sample of 50 baseball players was within $20,000 of the population mean, μ .
Dec
31
awarded  Yearling
Dec
28
comment geometric series with probability
The sum of the digits of your student number is 11, and its largest digit is 1, so you should actually solve it for k=9.
Dec
19
comment Minimizing a functional definite integral
Look up calculus of variations (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_of_variations), to see how these type of problems are normally dealt with. In your case, as Vibert points out, either $f(g)=0$ or $f(g) = -\inf$, depending on how you define minimisation, is the solution to your problem.
Dec
15
answered Obtaining the $\frac{1}{2\pi}$ factor in the Fourier transform
Dec
11
comment What is the necessary condition for a matrix to have eigenvalue 1?
There must be a vector that is unchanged by multiplication with the matrix, I don't really think there is much more to it...
Dec
10
answered Probability that distance between $X$ and $Y$ is $>$ $L/3$
Dec
10
answered How to mathematically express square to not “lose” sign of a vector
Dec
8
answered Improving Newton's iteration where the derivative is near zero?
Dec
7
comment Improving Newton's iteration where the derivative is near zero?
You could approximate your function at $x$ by a parabola, using $f(x)$, $f'(x)$ and $f''(x)$, instead of a line using just the first two...
Dec
7
answered Intersection of a line segment and a paraboloid in 3D
Dec
7
comment combinatoric question
Figuring out the sequences with two, but not more, consecutive 1s is the difficult thing...
Dec
7
comment combinatoric question
Ok, so it's not the same, but if instead of 3 consecutive 1s you are after only 2 consecutive 1s, the formula for "in how many ways can you arrange m 1s in n positions without having two consecutive 1s" is Binomial[n-m, m]. So you will have at least two consecutive ones in Binomial[n,m] - Binomial[n-m,m]. Figuring out how many have two, but not three consecutive 1's is beyond me right now...
Dec
7
comment combinatoric question
I thought about that one, but then you are counting 1 (111) ... and (111) 1 ... as different, which they are not. Your formula doesn't produce the right result for his first example
Dec
7
awarded  Critic
Dec
7
answered Derivatives of Functions