101 reputation
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age 24
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen Jun 30 at 14:00

I'm a science fiction & fantasy buff and casual tabletop gamer, recently graduated with bachelor's degrees in Computer Engineering and Computer Science (and a Japanese minor on the side).

Python and C++ are currently my preferred programming languages, but I've done some work with Objective-C (iOS apps) and some projects in Javascript (node.js, jQuery, etc.). I have possibly had more experience with Java than with Python or C++, but I have found that tasks that are comparatively elegant in Python and other languages that share similar design concepts (first-class functions, etc.) often require an annoying amount of boilerplate in Java (thankfully, Java 8's lambdas and method references seem like they'll alleviate a decent amount of my annoyances in that regard); I also wish Java had either reified generics or at least a bit more support for static/compile-time code generation like with C++'s templates (at the very least, method overriding based on runtime type would allow a whole lot of Java code that interfaces with non-generic/primitives-only APIs to be less verbose). I'm also trying out Scala and LISP, though I haven't made much progress on that recently.


Jun
10
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
@MJD Of the failure case, I meant.
Jun
9
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
Should it be assumed that "point" means "region on the dart board such that the area is 0" (or perhaps "0-dimensional region on the dart board", though the property would hold true for a 1-dimensional line as well), which would not necessarily coincide with the layman's definition of "point"?
Jun
9
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
What about higher-dimensional "edges"? (e.g. for $n=8$, there are no shared $(n-1)$-cubes, but what about $(n-2)$-cubes and so forth?) Or does the failure of the conjecture for $n>7$ imply that edges need not be shared either?
Jun
9
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
Would the logic equivalent be "This statement is false"?
Jan
31
comment Is conditional probability also probability?
@nomen Leaving aside Zado's (correct) comment, any (real, complex, or imaginary) number can be considered a ratio of itself out of 1. It's just that such treatment normally has no meaning on its own except as an intermediate step in an operation.
Jan
31
comment Is conditional probability also probability?
@smwikipedia To elaborate on Goos' comment, % is (usually) read as "percent", or more clearly, "per cent", where cent = 100. Thus, it defines an implicit ratio, in this case 80 out of 100 (which of course simplifies to the 4 out of 5 Goos mentions). In short, $P(X) = (100 * P(X))\%$.
Jan
17
comment Why do logarithms produce such difficult problems
As an extension, the reason the integer 2 (as opposed to a non-integer real value) is an exact solution is that this is a case of the more general equation $\log_{a}\left(x+u\right)=1-\log_{b}\left(x-v\right)$ where $x-v=1$ and $x+u=a$, which reduces the problem to $\log_{a}\left(a\right)=1-\log_{b}\left(1\right)$, $1=1-0$, $1=1$.
Jan
14
comment Splitting a sandwich and not feeling deceived
@user1729 Engineering students, not graduated engineers. It'd be their final design project.
Jan
14
comment Splitting a sandwich and not feeling deceived
@user1729 Engineering students would design the machine to ensure accurate proportioning to start with, you'd only need one button to start the machine (and to stop it, for safety reasons).
Jun
25
awarded  Informed
May
30
awarded  Supporter