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Mar
7
answered Do we need to formally teach the Greek Alphabet?
Feb
8
answered Help in understanding risch algorithm
Feb
2
awarded  Announcer
Jan
11
comment Pedagogy: How to cure students of the “law of universal linearity”?
Maybe "universal distributivity" would be a better name. In my experience, students love to distribute over addition, but it's less common that they want to pull out constants.
Jan
11
answered Pedagogy: How to cure students of the “law of universal linearity”?
Dec
21
comment Infiniteness of non-twin primes.
I think the dash in the title is in the wrong place. I thought you were looking for infinitely many primes $p, q$ with $p - q \neq 2$.
Dec
15
comment Understanding a proof of Diaconescu's theorem
"If $X=Y$ then the quoted definition would not give a function." Thanks, I think this was the key point I was missing.
Dec
15
accepted Understanding a proof of Diaconescu's theorem
Nov
24
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
19
answered Derivative of big O symbol
Nov
19
comment Derivative of big O symbol
$f(x) = O(1)$ just means that $f(x)$ is bounded near $0$. So your question just becomes, "if $f(x)$ is bounded near $0$ and $f(x)$ is analytic at $0$, then is $f'(x)$ bounded near $0$?".
Nov
4
comment Equivalence relation in finite subset of $\mathbb N$
"Now, it is easy to prove that if a positive rational number squared is natural, then the rational number itself is natural." +1. This way is much better than using factorization.
Nov
4
revised Equivalence relation in finite subset of $\mathbb N$
don't use . for multiplication
Nov
4
answered Why don't I get $e$ when I solve $\lim_{n\to \infty}(1 + \frac{1}{n})^n$?
Nov
4
comment Why don't I get $e$ when I solve $\lim_{n\to \infty}(1 + \frac{1}{n})^n$?
I've found an easier way to remember it as $\log(1^\infty) = \infty\log(1) = \infty 0$ (if it were determinate, then taking the log would preserve this).
Sep
18
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
29
comment Is it possible to put $+$ or $-$ signs in such a way that $\pm 1 \pm 2 \pm \cdots \pm 100 = 101$?
Frankly, I like your proof better than any of the answers.
Aug
29
answered Is there another simpler method to solve this elementary school math problem?
Aug
25
comment How to prove $n!>(\frac{n}{e})^{n}$
Some of the answers at math.stackexchange.com/questions/338954/… are related to this.
Aug
4
awarded  Yearling