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2d
comment Division of Normal and Poisson Distribution
Further, you need to specify whether you are referring to a standard Normal or general Normal.
2d
comment Finding joint distribution function?
Semantics shmenantics. He starts with a pdf, and is looking for a pdf.
Apr
28
comment Passengers on a plane
What happens if you are Chinese and living in Britain?
Apr
28
comment How to approach deriving a folder distribution's pdf from original pdf?
No. If $X \sim N(\mu, \sigma^2)$l, then $|X| \sim$ folded Normal. Your Erlang random variable is just truncated.
Apr
25
awarded  Yearling
Apr
19
comment Expectation of a transformation of a random variable
Why is the Gaussian case any different?
Apr
18
comment Assuming the two people wait for each other, what is the expected waiting time?
When did you last meet someone at a restaurant and wait 0 minutes for them to arrive (on average)?
Apr
17
awarded  Civic Duty
Apr
16
comment Tukey's symmetrical lambda distribution
The odd moments are zero. What are you going to do with the first 4 moments? And what are the constraints on parameter $\lambda$?
Apr
16
comment Tukey's symmetrical lambda distribution
What are $\lambda_1$ and $\lambda_2$?
Apr
13
revised How To Combine 1,2,3,4,5 into 333?
added 8 characters in body
Apr
11
comment Drawing cards without replacement: all kings before any jacks
You should never drink while playing cards.
Apr
8
answered How To Combine 1,2,3,4,5 into 333?
Apr
8
comment How To Combine 1,2,3,4,5 into 333?
To be 'nice', each digit should be used once only and in order from left to right ... i.e. 1 ....2...3 ...4...5. So far, only -12 + 345 satisfies the nice requirement (but that assumes that concatenation is allowed).
Apr
7
comment Mean of maximum from sample of discrete uniform distribution
Your solution appears to be incorrect.
Apr
2
revised Prove that the maximum of $n$ independent standard normal random variables, is asymptotically equivalent to $\sqrt(2\log n)$ almost surely.
added 75 characters in body
Apr
2
answered Prove that the maximum of $n$ independent standard normal random variables, is asymptotically equivalent to $\sqrt(2\log n)$ almost surely.
Apr
2
awarded  Excavator
Apr
2
revised Prove that the maximum of $n$ independent standard normal random variables, is asymptotically equivalent to $\sqrt(2\log n)$ almost surely.
typo fix in title
Mar
28
comment Gaussian Distribution in the form of rayleigh and uniform
What have you tried so far?