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  • 11 votes cast
Oct
12
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
10
awarded  Commentator
Oct
10
comment Ants moving on a grid
Ah, I got ~82 turns. I verified this was correct with someone else who wrote the simulation as well. I don't want to share my code since this is an interview question, but someone posted theirs on a similar question here: gist.github.com/dhalik/51a5c0dc621a43d3bb94
Oct
10
comment Ants moving on a grid
@Tad how would you invert that matrix in a reasonable amount of time? An O(n^3) algorithm would be rather slow. I could see maybe doing it via Cholesky factorization though?
Oct
10
comment Ants moving on a grid
Yes, the solution via simulation is trivial, but not what I'm interested in.
Oct
7
asked Ants moving on a grid
Jul
20
awarded  Critic
Sep
7
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
21
comment Limit of a summation
Ah I wish I could accept multiple answers. Both of your answers were incredibly helpful. Thanks so much!
Jun
21
accepted Limit of a summation
Jun
21
comment Limit of a summation
Ah, that explanation makes sense. Thank you very much.
Jun
21
comment Limit of a summation
Though I clearly specify that $x\to\infty$. Wouldn't WolframAlpha put out some message before making that assumption?
Jun
21
comment Limit of a summation
Yes, added it to the original post if this link doesn't work: wolframalpha.com/input/…
Jun
21
revised Limit of a summation
added 172 characters in body
Jun
21
comment Limit of a summation
But how does this explain what WolframAlpha is doing? Is it making a mistake?
Jun
21
asked Limit of a summation
Mar
23
awarded  Editor
Mar
17
comment Proof of Heine-Borel in $\mathbb R^n$
The first part of this proof seems to make sense and I understand that part of the construction of a finite subcovering, but I'm not sure what happens after "We strip off all the elements..." Is that necessary for the proof itself as didn't it just construct a finite subcovering? If so, could you explain that a little more?
Mar
17
accepted Proof of Heine-Borel in $\mathbb R^n$
Mar
17
comment Proof of Heine-Borel in $\mathbb R^n$
Finite covers, but we know that sequentially compact <=> compact for metric spaces.