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visits member for 1 year, 3 months
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Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
3
answered Negative Exponents, Why?
May
5
comment Non-unique prime factorisation
What happens if you replace $(6,0)=(1,1)*(1,-1)$ with $(z,z)*(z,-z)$?
Apr
30
comment Placing indistinguishable objects on a indistinguishable shelve
You have to take care here because the bookshelves are indistinguishable, therefore the permutations $\star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \,\star \mid\; \mid$ and $ \mid \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \mid$ are indistinguishable, for example.
Apr
25
revised Partial derivatives of polynomial in two variables
added instructions on performing the partial derivative.
Apr
24
answered Partial derivatives of polynomial in two variables
Apr
24
comment Partial derivatives of polynomial in two variables
I believe that $y$ should be raised to the power $j$ in your formula, as opposed to $i$?
Apr
19
awarded  Yearling
Apr
18
comment How to know if the mth root of n is an integer?
Yes, see, for example, cr.yp.to/papers/powers.pdf
Apr
14
revised Derivative of $\; y={(1+e^x)}^{0.5}\; $ using the definition of the derivative
corrected formatting
Apr
14
suggested suggested edit on Derivative of $\; y={(1+e^x)}^{0.5}\; $ using the definition of the derivative
Apr
14
comment Prove that there are two frogs in one square.
@DonAntonio - I assumed that we were supposed to wind up with two frogs per square for every square.
Apr
14
comment Prove that there are two frogs in one square.
@DonAntonio: Then there will only be a single frog on every white square, and a single black frog jumping onto the black square in front of it.
Apr
14
comment Prove that there are two frogs in one square.
This isn't about probability or combinatorics. This is related to the Hilbert Paradox of the Grand Hotel (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilbert's_paradox_of_the_Grand_Hotel).
Apr
14
comment Easy as $3.14$ question
The first entry is $2003=2$ therefore it's more likely prime digits (and letting 1 be prime as well).
Apr
11
comment Question regarding the golden/silver ratio
They have less and less importance as you increase in the height. If you look at the wikipedia page on the silver ratio (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_ratio) you can find section on "silver means" that generalizes it to "metallic means" and then specifically mentions the "bronze mean".
Apr
11
comment Partial derivatives and functions equal to 0
$F(x,y,p)$ is not always equal to zero either. Let $p,x=1$ and see if it is equal then.
Apr
11
comment P, NP-Complete and NP-Hard Problems
My bad, I guess I assumed NP-Hard problems had to be decidable, but NP-Hard problems don't have to adhere to that constraint.
Apr
11
comment P, NP-Complete and NP-Hard Problems
Three issues: One, a polynomial time algorithm is one which can be solived in POLYNOMIAL TIME for the input. These are not just the problems that can be solved. They can be solved "quickly" (or what we usually say is "tractably"). Second, the halting problem is not in NP-Hard. Third, keep in mind that P vs. NP only applies to a GENERAL problem - not to specific instances. In fact, for many specific instances of NP-Complete problems there are polynomial solutions, but for the general problem, it may take exponential complexity.
Apr
10
comment Relationship between the Weierstrass function and other fractals
@DaveL.Renfro: Yes, it's not a well-defined question, yet. I think an example being definable via any of those senses without being self-similar would be interesting however.