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visits member for 1 year, 9 months
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Jan
27
comment Equation system modulo prime
if $p=14$ then $13\equiv 5*11$, so $p$ can definitely be greater than $13$
Jan
21
asked Aggregation Urn Distribution
Jan
19
comment Counting rings of order $p^3$
Ah, yes, of course. I apologize. You're absolutely correct.
Jan
19
comment Counting rings of order $p^3$
I think its worth pointing out that the number listed in the series in OEIS is also 52. So in that regard MathWorld and OEIS agree.
Jan
6
comment If a prime number is reversed, and then appended to itself, why is the result always a composite number?
@HaraldHanche-Olsen: Any number appended in reverse to itself will necessarily have an even number of digits.
Jan
2
answered Minimum moves to destroy
Jan
2
comment Minimum moves to destroy
I don't think you'll get an $O(n)$ algorithm, at best probably $O(n log(n))$.
Dec
29
comment Does my “Prime Factor Look-and-Say” sequence always end?
How would you handle the number $314928$?
Dec
18
comment Is it possible to permute an unknown binary sequence so that two particular bits are equal?
If we restrict the problem to input sequences in which there are at least two of each value (i.e. all sequences of 1's and 0's which have at least two 1's and at least two 0's) then it becomes possible.
Dec
3
accepted Proving a property about quadratic residues
Dec
3
comment Proving a property about quadratic residues
Perfect, I knew I was missing something simple.
Dec
3
asked Proving a property about quadratic residues
Oct
7
comment Is there a discrete relationship shared between patterns and series or sequences?
For your example, to define the pattern as a sequence you might use $a(n) = a(n-1) + 2010 + 200*(n \% 2)$. There's not necessarily a reason to suggest that the next number in the sequence HAS to be +2210, but absent any other available information it's a reasonable choice for continuing the pattern. Although consider if the sequence had been instead $a(n) = a(n-1)+2010+200*(f(n))$ where $f(n)$ is the fibonacci sequence starting with the unconventional $1,0,1,1,2,...$ The initial three terms would still be identical.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
3
answered Why do negative exponents work the way they do?
May
5
comment Non-unique prime factorisation
What happens if you replace $(6,0)=(1,1)*(1,-1)$ with $(z,z)*(z,-z)$?
Apr
30
comment Placing indistinguishable objects on a indistinguishable shelve
You have to take care here because the bookshelves are indistinguishable, therefore the permutations $\star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \,\star \mid\; \mid$ and $ \mid \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \star \mid$ are indistinguishable, for example.
Apr
25
revised Partial derivatives of polynomial in two variables
added instructions on performing the partial derivative.
Apr
24
answered Partial derivatives of polynomial in two variables
Apr
24
comment Partial derivatives of polynomial in two variables
I believe that $y$ should be raised to the power $j$ in your formula, as opposed to $i$?