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seen Oct 14 at 2:04

Oct
12
accepted Conditional Entropy in rolling a dice
Oct
12
revised Conditional Entropy in rolling a dice
edited title
Oct
12
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Conditional Entropy in rolling a dice
Oct
12
awarded  Editor
Oct
12
revised Conditional Entropy in rolling a dice
added 158 characters in body; edited tags
Oct
12
asked Conditional Entropy in rolling a dice
Apr
23
comment The Carnival Dice game
No, and I think by "fair" he only means whether our chance of winning the game is, at least, 50 percent.
Apr
23
accepted The Carnival Dice game
Apr
23
comment The Carnival Dice game
Thanks. Yeah, I actually wrote down the tree and it is pretty simple as it doesn't branch out after the number shows up, so it stays pretty small. I was wondering why the author had intentionally avoided it. Now I see, maybe he just wanted to expand the tool set, introducing other techniques too.
Apr
23
comment The Carnival Dice game
I still find the solution relatively easy, and I don't understand why the author had to go out of his way to use a formula from set theory.
Apr
23
comment The Carnival Dice game
I don't agree that it is complicated or impractical. I actually wrote down the graph myself and it seems quite easy to work out. Remember that the game stops whenever the number shows up in the dice. So I don't have to actually draw the whole tree. There's a 1/6 chance that it may show up in the first try, in which case the game is over and the player wins. Otherwise another numbers shows up, the chance of which is 5/6. I only have to analyze this branch further and it turns out there are only two cases and it rounds up to this: (1/6) + (5/6 * 1/6) + (5/6*5/6*1/6) which is roughly 0.413
Apr
22
comment The Carnival Dice game
Thanks for your edit. But it does involve the application of set theory in solving a probability question.
Apr
22
awarded  Custodian
Apr
22
reviewed Approve suggested edit on The Carnival Dice game
Apr
22
awarded  Cleanup
Apr
22
revised The Carnival Dice game
rolled back to a previous revision
Apr
22
asked The Carnival Dice game
Apr
6
comment There are no bearded men in the world - What goes wrong in this proof?
@MarkAmery I agree. Eckhard's answer is reasonable and good enough, that's why I accepted it. But this one tackles the issue at a more fundamental level. Thereby I now set this one as as the best answer. I'm new to SO, I hope changing the accepted answer is not frowned upon.
Apr
6
accepted There are no bearded men in the world - What goes wrong in this proof?
Apr
6
awarded  Popular Question