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Feb
29
comment Newton's Law of Cooling and General advice on modeling with ODE
Ok, I think I understand now. I'm not feeling well now, but I'll circle back and try to provide an answer in a couple of days.
Feb
29
comment Newton's Law of Cooling and General advice on modeling with ODE
What do you mean by "I know the question for this answer "? I'd like to give some advice, but I'm not sure exactly what you're asking.
Feb
29
comment How to rotate the positions of a matrix by 90 degrees
@mvw, ok I've removed the downvote for now. When I evaluated the answer I thought it was complete.
Feb
29
comment How to rotate the positions of a matrix by 90 degrees
@mvw, is your answer unfinished?
Feb
29
comment How to rotate the positions of a matrix by 90 degrees
I downvoted because I agree with Théophile. If the answer changes to answer the OP's question I will remove the downvote.
Feb
28
comment Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals Semi Proof
This link also math.stackexchange.com/questions/1674064/…
Feb
28
comment Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals Semi Proof
Hope that helps.
Feb
28
answered Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals Semi Proof
Feb
28
comment Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals Semi Proof
$\nabla f = \vec{r}$ in this case to answer your question.
Feb
28
comment Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals Semi Proof
math.stackexchange.com/questions/1674044/…
Feb
28
comment Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals Semi Proof
This question was asked yesterday, by someone who was using multiple accounts to post related questions. Was that also you?
Feb
27
revised Why isn't there a formula for $\zeta(k)=\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{n^k}$ involving $\pi$ when $k$ is odd?
deleted 2 characters in body
Feb
27
revised Why isn't there a formula for $\zeta(k)=\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{n^k}$ involving $\pi$ when $k$ is odd?
added 5 characters in body
Feb
27
revised Why isn't there a formula for $\zeta(k)=\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{n^k}$ involving $\pi$ when $k$ is odd?
Forgot some factors of $\pi$
Feb
27
answered Why isn't there a formula for $\zeta(k)=\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{n^k}$ involving $\pi$ when $k$ is odd?
Feb
27
answered Show that $\int_{c}{\textbf{r}\cdot d\textbf{r}} = \frac{1}{2}[||\textbf{r}(b)||^2 - ||\textbf{r}(a)||^2] $
Feb
27
comment Show that $\int_{c}{\textbf{r}\cdot d\textbf{r}} = \frac{1}{2}[||\textbf{r}(b)||^2 - ||\textbf{r}(a)||^2] $
To elaborate on T.Bongers' statement, in the line he is referring to the partial derivative operator appears out of nowhere. What would be correct is $\nabla \frac12 \| x \|^2 = x$.
Feb
20
comment Fourier Transform Basics
In general the statement is not true. $e^{i 3.1\xi}$ has a norm of $1$ but when expanded in an infinite Fourier series it has more than two nonzero coefficients. Are there any special conditions on the sequence $f(n)$?
Feb
20
comment Fourier Transform Basics
To answer your question the fact you observed can be shown formally for any finite sequence. Just use the distributive property.