12,115 reputation
11641
bio website math.bgu.ac.il/~gulkod
location Beersheba, Israel
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen yesterday

I'm a Ph.D. student at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
My research interests include algebraic groups in general and linear groups in particular, representations of groups - in particular highly and sharply transitive representations.


Nov
24
revised Placing 5 pieces on a 5x5 grid with no main diagonal
added 108 characters in body
Nov
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
24
answered Placing 5 pieces on a 5x5 grid with no main diagonal
Nov
20
reviewed Leave Closed Solving those limits without using L'hospital
Nov
20
reviewed Looks OK Expected Number of Coin Tosses to Get Five Consecutive Heads
Nov
20
reviewed Looks OK How do I simplify inverse tangent?
Nov
19
answered Prove that $\sum_{n=0}^{\infty }\frac{(2n+1)!!}{(n+1)!}2^{-(2n+4)}=\frac{3-2\sqrt{2}}{4}$
Nov
19
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Convert to polar and evaluate
Nov
4
answered How many outputs possible when throwing $m$ balls into $n$ bins?
Nov
4
comment How many outputs possible when throwing $m$ balls into $n$ bins?
I don't understand your notation. In option 1 you seem to have 6 balls total, while in option 10 you seem to have 9 balls total... Or do you mean throw at least 1 and at most $m$ into each bin?
Oct
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Aug
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
17
comment Find $R$ such that $\sum\limits_{n=2k}^{3k}\binom{3k}{n}\cdot{(R)}^n\cdot{(1-R)}^{3k-n}$ is constant for all $k\in\mathbb{N}$
I guess it's a trivial suggestion, but did you look at $$1=(R+(1-R))^{3k}=\sum_{n=0}^{3k}\binom{3k}{n}R^n(1-R)^{3k-n}$$ Then you can denote $$B_k=\sum_{n=k}^{2k}\binom{3k}{n}R^n(1-R)^{3k-n}, \hspace{5pt}C_k=\sum_{n=0}^{k}\binom{3k}{n}R^n(1-R)^{3k-n}$$ And then $A_k+B_k+C_k=1$. I'm not sure it leads anywhere, but seems like a good place to start from. $A_k$ and $C_k$ look symmetric in a way.
Jul
10
answered The best way to factorize?
Jul
9
comment Show $f(t) = t$ given $\int_0^1 t^n f(t) dt = \frac{1}{n+2}\quad \forall n\in\mathbb{N}.$
Then - it seems correct!
Jul
9
comment Show $f(t) = t$ given $\int_0^1 t^n f(t) dt = \frac{1}{n+2}\quad \forall n\in\mathbb{N}.$
What is your question?
Jul
9
reviewed Reopen Are NSA Mathematicians second-rate?
Jul
6
reviewed Reviewed Limits of $\frac{1+\cos\theta}{\sin^2\theta}$
Jul
6
comment Limits of $\frac{1+\cos\theta}{\sin^2\theta}$
I edited it they way it seemed reasonable for me. Can you please elaborate on what do you know what you tried ("factor it" - what does it mean?)