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visits member for 1 year, 9 months
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Dec
9
awarded  Caucus
Dec
3
comment Nobody told me that self teaching could be so damaging…
I get the sense that you feel you know every aspect of the subjects you are taking. There is absolutely no way that is true; you simply haven't looked hard enough to find the interesting stuff. Often times the book will have exercises geared toward the more advanced reader at the end of its exercise sets, see if that is true for your textbooks. Also, look for patterns in your problems sets or see if there is some abstract result that solves your problems more efficiently or gives you deeper understanding of the answers.
Dec
2
comment Determine $\phi(2^{399}+1)$
My crystal ball works!
Nov
14
comment Determine $\phi(2^{399}+1)$
Intended answer: some very large number.
Oct
19
comment xy+x+y=0 What is the inverse Element?
@Clayton Your confusion arises from mixing up the two multiplication operations.
Oct
19
comment Excercise: Find the volume of the parallelepiped
In your formula, a, b, and c are not points. ;)
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
4
comment Bisectors problem
So it is just a hypothesis that N exists and B lies between M and N?
Sep
4
comment What is the flaw in this proof that all triangles are isosceles?
You read the statement somewhere, it would help us if you indicated where you read it.
Sep
3
comment Bisectors problem
That's what I guessed, chen h.; however consider a 45-45-90 triangle with legs AC, BC. Then the bisector of the supplementary angle of ACB is parallel to AB.
Sep
3
comment Bisectors problem
Just wondering, what is the supplementary angle of a given angle? I took a guess, but it does not always happen that B lies between M and N with my choice.
Sep
1
comment Right-adjoint to the inverse image functor
I discovered the right-adjoint $g$ by considering two simple examples. Let $f_1$ be the function from the set of two points to the singleton set. Let $f_2$ be the function $\{a,b,c\}\to\{u,v\}\colon a,b\mapsto u,c\mapsto v$. Perhaps these considerations will help you too.
Sep
1
comment question about $Spec(A)$ in Atiyah's book Introduction to Commutative Algebra
@claire Yep, there is no such thing as an infinite sum. We sometimes abuse notation and write $\sum_{i\in I}f_ig_i$, $g_i\in A$ and all but finitely many of the $g_i$ are zero.
Sep
1
comment question about $Spec(A)$ in Atiyah's book Introduction to Commutative Algebra
@claire You need to be a little more careful, since you may notice that your description allows for infinite sums in $A$ (something that makes no sense in your random ring $A$).
Sep
1
answered question about $Spec(A)$ in Atiyah's book Introduction to Commutative Algebra
Jul
16
comment Calculating a Factorial Base Representation
While it is hard to be more explicit in your statement of the algorithm, a proof of it would be nice (I have proven it myself--I am just suggesting an improvement for your answer)
Jun
27
comment Definition of relatively prime in UFD´s
BTW, it's great that you are comparing the definitions from two sources.
Jun
27
comment Definition of relatively prime in UFD´s
If it was not a Unique Factorization Domain, you would be 100% correct.
Jun
27
comment why is the answer 21,845 and not 218,450?
This is a great example indicating the value in estimating an answer prior to computing it. $5.47/6.26$ is larger than $5/7$ which is $0.7142857...>7/10$. So the true answer is greater than $7*25,000=175,000$.