Reputation
492
Top tag
Next privilege 500 Rep.
Access review queues
Badges
2 10
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~12k people reached

May
7
comment Determine Taylor's formula for multivariable equation
$(c_1,c_2)$ are part of the remainder term. Basically, since it said remainder is going to be order 3, what you do is basically 3rd derivative of $\ln(x)$, then substitute for the variables. 3rd derivative is $\frac{1}{x^3}$, so $x$ being represented as $c_1 + 2c_2$
May
7
accepted Determine Taylor's formula for multivariable equation
May
7
revised Determine Taylor's formula for multivariable equation
added 1 character in body
May
7
asked Determine Taylor's formula for multivariable equation
Mar
19
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
accepted Prove that $f_n$ converges uniformly to $f$.
Feb
17
comment Prove that $f_n$ converges uniformly to $f$.
Ah, so my computation was almost there. I just needed to get rid of the edge case.
Feb
17
comment Prove that $f_n$ converges uniformly to $f$.
@graydad then does that mean there is no way to choose an N, and hence it does not converge uniformly?
Feb
17
comment Prove that $f_n$ converges uniformly to $f$.
Actually, if I assume $e^{1/n} < \epsilon$, then $n < 1/\ln(\epsilon)$, so can I make $N = 1/\ln(\epsilon)$
Feb
17
asked Prove that $f_n$ converges uniformly to $f$.
Feb
17
accepted Prove that for real number $r > 0$ the seq of funcs $f_n(x) = \frac{e^x}{1 + n + x^2}$ converges uniformly on $[−r, r]$ to the 0 function.
Feb
15
asked Prove that for real number $r > 0$ the seq of funcs $f_n(x) = \frac{e^x}{1 + n + x^2}$ converges uniformly on $[−r, r]$ to the 0 function.
Feb
15
comment What is the significance of the Uniform Cauchy Criterion vs just being uniformly convergent?
I think this question pertains to uniformity of convergence/cauchy criterion, but I think the difference between the two is that with the cauchy criterion, you only need to focus on the values greater than $N$. It eliminates having to think about the rest of the sequence, which simplifies a lot. I think...?
Feb
15
revised What is the significance of the Uniform Cauchy Criterion vs just being uniformly convergent?
deleted 3 characters in body
Feb
15
asked What is the significance of the Uniform Cauchy Criterion vs just being uniformly convergent?
Feb
15
comment Inverse proportion - Word Problem
I like to think of $k$ as the Constant of Proportionality. So, if we're given a point $B = 5, A = 2$, then they'll give us a Constant of Proportionality, $k$, that relates them somehow. Once we know $k$, we can figure out the respective $B$ or $A$ for any pair. Once you know $k$ relative to a $B, A$ pair you can ask "I wonder what $B$ will be for $A = 10$" or "I wonder what $A$ will be for $B = 15$".
Feb
15
comment Inverse proportion - Word Problem
So, we know that $B^2 * (A + 3) = k$. If we use $B = 5, A = 2$, then we see that $5^2 * (2 + 3) = 125$ because we're substituting in $B$ and $A$. Once we have 125,we know $k$, and $A$ because they tell us that $A = 17$. So, if you go back you see $B^2 * (17 + 3) = 125$ and then you solve for $B$. Essentially, inverse proportion means that as $A$ grows, $B$ shrinks. We know how $B$ and $A$ are related based on $B^2 * (A + 3)$. When someone gives us other values of $B$ and $A$ like $B = 5, A = 2$ we're given an actual point to base calculations off of. Which is how we know $B$ for $A = 17$.
Feb
15
answered Inverse proportion - Word Problem
Feb
5
comment What is the radius of convergence of $\sum_{k = 0}^{\infty} 3^{k^2}x^{k^2}$
How does $3^{k^2}$ becomes $(3x)^j$?
Feb
5
asked What is the radius of convergence of $\sum_{k = 0}^{\infty} 3^{k^2}x^{k^2}$