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1d
comment If $\omega + 1 = \omega$, find $\omega$ ($\omega \not= - \infty$ or $\infty$)
yes sorry didn't see it before posting.
1d
answered If $\omega + 1 = \omega$, find $\omega$ ($\omega \not= - \infty$ or $\infty$)
2d
comment Abstract Algebra and Chess
Why do you think about group theory specifically ? I don't see any aspect of chess where group theory would be useful...
Oct
20
comment Cool little system of equations.
@JackiePoehler We know that $b>a-b$, because $2^b=3^b-3^{a-b}$.So $2b-a>0$, and both factors are integers.
Oct
20
comment Cool little system of equations.
yes but this is easy to rule out this case from the original equations.
Oct
20
answered Cool little system of equations.
Oct
15
comment Derivative of $\sin x$ for small $x$.
for all $x$, $\sin(\pi+x)=-\sin(x)$ (look at the circle).
Oct
15
answered Showing that a polynomial is irreducible
Oct
15
answered Derivative of $\sin x$ for small $x$.
Oct
15
comment What's an easy way to show that $GL(n,\mathbb C)$ is connected?
the intuition is that almost all matrices are inversibles
Oct
14
answered Recursion: Dividing n people into groups of 1 or 2
Oct
14
answered What's pratical use of Derivate function calculus?
Oct
13
comment Consider nonzero $A_{2\times 2}$ such that $A^2 = \vec{0}$. Prove or disprove that dim$($ker$(A)) = 2$
for any size $n\times n$, if you take a matrix with only a $1$ at the upper right, and $0$ elsewhere, it will be that $A^2=0$, and $dim(ker(A))=n-1$.
Oct
13
revised Consider nonzero $A_{2\times 2}$ such that $A^2 = \vec{0}$. Prove or disprove that dim$($ker$(A)) = 2$
added 5 characters in body
Oct
13
answered Consider nonzero $A_{2\times 2}$ such that $A^2 = \vec{0}$. Prove or disprove that dim$($ker$(A)) = 2$
Oct
10
comment Let $G$ be a finite group. Show that $G$ is isomorphic to a subgroup of $S_n$ (symmetric group).
Yes sorry $S_n$ has the cardinality $n!$ of course.
Oct
10
comment Let $G$ be a finite group. Show that $G$ is isomorphic to a subgroup of $S_n$ (symmetric group).
It is not true that $G$ will be isomorph to $S_n$. It will be isomorph to a subgroup of $S_{n!}$.
Oct
8
comment Example of a specific type of infinite group
I don't get why the answer does not fit your requirements. For instance dyadics in $\mathbb Q/{\mathbb Z}$.
Oct
8
answered Closed operations on regular languages
Oct
8
comment Example of a specific type of infinite group
duplicate: math.stackexchange.com/questions/513700/…