359 reputation
212
bio website about.me/david.eisner
location Maryland
age
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Dec 8 at 16:21

I'm a software engineer and system administrator at the University of Maryland.


Nov
16
awarded  Informed
Nov
5
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
8
awarded  Tumbleweed
Jul
6
awarded  Nice Question
May
16
awarded  Popular Question
May
13
awarded  Caucus
Feb
7
revised How to find bounds for $x$ and $y$ for this triple integral?
fixed grammar in question title
Feb
7
suggested approved edit on How to find bounds for $x$ and $y$ for this triple integral?
Jan
4
comment Bayes Theorem Example in Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise
"If we know that the first crash was a terrorist attack" .. but we don't know that. All we know is that there was a first crash. Knowing this, the probability that the first crash was a terrorist attack is not 100%. It's 38%. And the probability that we have just experienced an accidental crash is 61.5%.
Jan
4
comment Bayes Theorem Example in Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise
Qiaochu: Regarding the first comment, APC and TPA aren't disjoint (mutually exclusive) when there have been 2 or more crashes, so the probabilities need not add up to 1. There is merit to your second comment. But the problem is that after the first plane crash, we don't know whether it was a terrorist attack or an accident. All we know is that a plane has crashed into a building. Later on, all we know is that two planes have crashed into buildings. The question after each crash is: how likely is it that a terrorist attack has occurred.
Jan
4
awarded  Editor
Jan
4
revised Bayes Theorem Example in Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise
fixed spelling mistake
Jan
4
asked Bayes Theorem Example in Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
18
accepted Counterexamples to “Naive Induction”
Sep
13
comment Average Distance Between Random Points on a Line
On the third line of the $\mathbb{E}(Y)$ derivation, shouldn't $d x_1$ and $d x_2$ be swapped? (Or the limits of the integrals.) Pedantic, I know.
Sep
13
awarded  Commentator
Sep
13
comment Average Distance Between Random Points on a Line
Care to elaborate, @Byron?
Sep
13
comment Average Distance Between Random Points on a Line
In the fourth sentence ("Moreover..") there are two places where on the RHS you wrote $x_2$ when you meant $x_1$, if I am not mistaken.
Sep
12
comment Counterexamples to “Naive Induction”
Thanks for the pointers, I missed those in my search. I now have enough material to keep me busy for awhile.