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 Curious
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Mar
25
comment For a polynomial $f\in\mathbb Z[X]$ there exists some natural number $m>2016$ such that $|f(m)|$ is not a prime number.
OP asked for hint. It's good enough to deduce some variation of your answer.
Mar
23
answered For a polynomial $f\in\mathbb Z[X]$ there exists some natural number $m>2016$ such that $|f(m)|$ is not a prime number.
Mar
20
answered Finding the limit as $n \to \infty $ of $n\ln\left(1+\frac{\ x}{n^2}\right)$
Mar
18
revised How many real roots does the equation $e^x-x^2=0$ have?
Fixed defect in the answer.
Mar
18
comment How many real roots does the equation $e^x-x^2=0$ have?
Thanks for catching a mistake. :)
Mar
17
answered How many real roots does the equation $e^x-x^2=0$ have?
Mar
16
revised Determine if $\sum_{n=2}^\infty(\sqrt{n^2+4}-\sqrt{n^2-4})$ is convergent
deleted 4 characters in body
Mar
16
comment Determine if $\sum_{n=2}^\infty(\sqrt{n^2+4}-\sqrt{n^2-4})$ is convergent
You're completely right. My apologies about the mistake. I fixed it.
Mar
16
revised Determine if $\sum_{n=2}^\infty(\sqrt{n^2+4}-\sqrt{n^2-4})$ is convergent
edited body
Mar
16
answered Determine if $\sum_{n=2}^\infty(\sqrt{n^2+4}-\sqrt{n^2-4})$ is convergent
Mar
15
comment Which FOL consequence relation is better (to teach)?
Probably you're right. On the other side, I will still have to study about Mendelson's variation next year - with the teacher who, if I can believe him, didn't know about the other possibility (other kind of GEN rule, at least).
Mar
14
accepted 'Canonical' form of permutations, product of transpositions
Mar
14
comment 'Canonical' form of permutations, product of transpositions
This method (as I got told - also used in permutation parity theorem proof) is natural and possibly the only reasonable one. Thanks for your answer.
Mar
14
comment 'Canonical' form of permutations, product of transpositions
Yes. Thank you!
Mar
14
comment 'Canonical' form of permutations, product of transpositions
For example, $(1 3)(1 2)$ results in $(1 2)(2 3)(3 3)$. (Last transposition will always be like $(3 3)$ and therefore can always be skipped, actually.)
Mar
14
comment 'Canonical' form of permutations, product of transpositions
I have bad wording in question, probably. In my question I have (or tried to say that I have): 1) list of multiplied elementary transpositions; 2) a form into what I want to simplify this product - using only operations with transpositions. (Calculating the given permutation and from that needed result is easy but that's not what I'm searching for.)
Mar
14
awarded  Curious
Mar
13
comment Which FOL consequence relation is better (to teach)?
Nice to see that I'm not the only one with such opinion. If I need I can work with Mendelson's variation - it has different inference rules, that's all. Using them formally won't be difficult (just add those implicit quantifiers in your mind) and I understand them, but they're unnatural. I will have to do this during next year studies and I dislike this fact a bit. :(
Mar
13
revised Which FOL consequence relation is better (to teach)?
Minor edit (removed 'also' from list of points).
Mar
13
asked Which FOL consequence relation is better (to teach)?