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ubiq·ui·ba·con - a side of a pig cured and smoked existing or being everywhere at the same time.


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Mar
31
comment How can I show this in a summation?
@Mitch RTT - Round Trip Time
Mar
31
accepted How can I show this in a summation?
Mar
31
comment How can I show this in a summation?
@Matt Groff yes that does make things more clear. Thanks a bunch!
Mar
31
revised How can I show this in a summation?
deleted 331 characters in body; added 331 characters in body
Mar
30
revised How can I show this in a summation?
added 179 characters in body
Mar
30
asked How can I show this in a summation?
Feb
27
comment Help calculating a series
I guess my problem is seeing the relation between the summations in their closed form and their factored equivalent. I understand well enough now to muddle my way through, and many sites show the factored equivalents of summations, but I would still like to see how I could factor a closed form summation with a higher order n (like maybe n^7, or something higher) that hasn't already been pre-calculated for me on some site. Finding how to manually calculate the factored equivalent of closed form summations was my main goal with this question, but I didn't know that when I asked :)
Feb
27
comment Help calculating a series
This was good info for me, but knowing the little trick in the answer I selected will likely make my life easier in the very near future.
Feb
27
comment Are the notations lg^2 n and (lg n)^2 the same thing?
I asked around and in my particular case it means (lg n)^2)
Feb
27
accepted Are the notations lg^2 n and (lg n)^2 the same thing?
Feb
27
accepted Help calculating a series