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1d
revised What is the difference between $A^{-1}$ and $A^\Theta$?
Explained what $A^H$ denotes
1d
suggested approved edit on What is the difference between $A^{-1}$ and $A^\Theta$?
1d
comment What is the difference between $A^{-1}$ and $A^\Theta$?
The operation you denote by $\Theta$ is not taking the "unitary" matrix of $A$, it is taking the complex conjugate. The definition of unitary (which is a property of a particular matrix as Seven mentioned above) is $A \cdot A^{\Theta} = I = A^{\Theta} \cdot A$. The complex conjugate is often denoted by $A^*$ or $A^\dagger$.
1d
comment Bayes theorem example
That is the point of the question, to emphasize that Bayes theorem contradicts our intuition in this kind of situation.
2d
awarded  Organizer
2d
revised How to find high power numbers modulo
Calculator tag was not appropriate
2d
suggested approved edit on How to find high power numbers modulo
Apr
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
16
comment Understanding the definition of nowhere dense sets in Abbott's Understanding Analysis
@MarioCarneiro Good point, this is in fact how I have usually seen it defined in books on general topology (with good reason). I did not use it because the asker said he is not familiar with the concept of an interior.
Apr
16
comment Understanding the definition of nowhere dense sets in Abbott's Understanding Analysis
+1 for sorry for asking a question about understanding a definition in a book named Understanding Analyis
Apr
16
revised Understanding the definition of nowhere dense sets in Abbott's Understanding Analysis
added 228 characters in body
Apr
16
answered Understanding the definition of nowhere dense sets in Abbott's Understanding Analysis
Apr
16
comment How can we terminate in a finite amount of time?
@Somnaire And yes, a program always terminates if and only if it terminates for every input. Almost surely might have some mathematical subtlety attached, but always does not :)
Apr
16
comment How can we terminate in a finite amount of time?
@Somniare To prove that for the Lebesgue measure (from first principles) is a bit involved, as the definition of the Lebesgue measure is not exactly trivial. Informally, the Lebesgue measure finds "the best approximation" of a set as a union of disjoint (closed) intervals, and then adds the length of those intervals. There are a lot of details, but they won't make much sense without some measure theory. So any interval $(a, b]$ (open, closed, or half-open) has length $b - a$ under the Lebesgue measure.
Apr
16
suggested rejected edit on Sum of the last four digits of $3^{2015}$
Apr
16
awarded  Custodian
Apr
16
reviewed Reviewed Determine the possible grouping
Apr
15
comment Proving that these curves intersect
@graviola Exactly.
Apr
14
comment Proving that these curves intersect
@graviola Ah my mistake. If it is not simple, then you can reduce the curve by eliminating all the loops created by any self-intersections. The resulting curve's image is a subset of the original curve's image, so proving the result for the modified curve implies it for the original curve.
Apr
14
answered Proving that these curves intersect