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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jun 11 '13 at 7:57

Apr
26
comment Finding nth degree polynomial functions
I need to practice some more of these, but you've pointed me in the right direction. Thanks.
Feb
4
comment What is a good reference for basic shape detection algorithms
Wow... that's... a lot of information. It's an incredible resource if I want to learn everything about computer vision, but it's far more than I need for 15 PowerPoint slides. For the time being it does seem to be the best resource to pull from, though, since all of the information is sure to match up being written by a single author.
Jan
31
comment Solving equations that contain summations
After pounding into my head what those formulas represent, it turns out that they are far more helpful than I originally thought. I'll go ahead and credit you with the answer on this one. Thanks very much for the assistance. Also, there should be 10 layers.
Jan
31
comment Solving equations that contain summations
Okay, that makes sense. Thanks @DavidMitra.
Jan
31
comment Solving equations that contain summations
I'm still working through what you're saying here. It takes me a long time to make sense of things like this since I'm new to them, and there's a bit of math anxiety starting to creep up on me (which is not something I'm used to, either).
Jan
31
comment Solving equations that contain summations
This seems to be exactly what I'm looking for, but I'd like some more information on why that can be done. I can see what you did, but I have no idea why that can be done. I think there is something about summations that I don't understand yet.
Jan
31
comment Solving equations that contain summations
@DavidMitra That post is very helpful, and I think I will have a solid grasp on this if you could further explain how you got from $\displaystyle\sum\limits_{i=1}^n (4+2i)$ to $4n + 2\displaystyle\sum\limits_{i=1}^n i$.
Jan
31
comment Solving equations that contain summations
No, but it is certainly something I could research.
Jan
28
comment What is this set theory question even asking me?
@AndréNicolas - Yes, I did transfer Matthew's comment into an answer, but I wasn't concerned with credit, I was just wanting to wrap up the question so those answering could help others. I'm glad I wasn't able to accept it right away, though, as much more insight has been provided on this problem since then.
Jan
28
comment What is this set theory question even asking me?
@AndréNicolas - The edits you have made now include the answer, and since Matthew only commented, you've got the credit. Thanks very much!
Jan
28
comment What is this set theory question even asking me?
@gnometorule - That's what I came up with based on what Matthew told me as well. Andre helped me with coming up with some of the combinations that would be used in the formula, but I wasn't sure what to do with them since what I didn't know is that the question wanted me to find the value of n such that one quarter of the sets would include a 7.
Jan
28
comment What is this set theory question even asking me?
Thanks to Matthew who commented above I know what it's asking me to do. You're answer, though very helpful, didn't really answer what I was supposed to be doing, but guided me towards the first steps to find that answer. I certainly appreciate the response, though!
Jan
28
comment What is this set theory question even asking me?
@Matthew That's exactly the information I was looking for. If you had posted this as an answer instead of a comment I'd be marking this as answered by you. Thanks.
Jan
27
comment How to verify if a compound logical statement is a tautology using substitution
Ah, okay. I actually remember reading that one, but I didn't see how to apply the concept here. I've been rushing to learn enumeration/combinatorics, first-order logic, and set-theoretic concepts. I was given one week to familiarize myself with these concepts and do an assignment that has four questions in each category. I guess I haven't had the time to focus on one concept long enough for everything to stick. This is by far the most difficult course I've ever taken, lol. Thanks again for the help.
Jan
27
comment How to verify if a compound logical statement is a tautology using substitution
Also, as a supplemental question, was I correct when I determined that it could not be further simplified?
Jan
27
comment How to verify if a compound logical statement is a tautology using substitution
Okay, I revisited my truth table and you're right, I messed up that part. Turns out I actually know what I'm doing (even if it doesn't feel like I do), I just made a careless mistake. Thanks a ton, Johannes.
Jan
24
comment How many ways can 1's and 2's be added to equal 17 if order matters?
Yeah, that made a lot more sense, but by the time I read it I had the formula worked out. Great job in guiding me to the answer instead of just handing it over, though. I truly appreciate that.
Jan
24
comment How many ways can 1's and 2's be added to equal 17 if order matters?
I figured out the proof by staring at the numbers I put under the listings I made for each of the smaller numbers, 3-6 in this case. I realized that each number was the two numbers before it added together and worked out a formula I can use from that. Thanks a ton. =) I would vote you up if I had the rep for it.
Jan
24
comment How many ways can 1's and 2's be added to equal 17 if order matters?
Hmm, that's not familiar from our reading. The only thing I remember seeing that seems like it would apply to this is the binomial theorem for combinatorics, but I've yet to find a way to apply it.
Jan
24
comment How many ways can 1's and 2's be added to equal 17 if order matters?
Okay, I've done that and figured out with Google that the pattern you refer to is the Fibonacci pattern. Unfortunately we haven't learned about that in our coursework, so I'm not comfortable basing my answer on it. I'm still working on the proof aspect though, since that is something I could use.