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seen Mar 4 at 16:02

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
13
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
8
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
22
awarded  Yearling
Jan
20
comment Showing differentiabililty at a particular point.
Thanks for your response. I'm getting $a$ and $b$ to be any real number. Is that right?
Jan
20
comment Showing differentiabililty at a particular point.
yes I did. corrected.
Jan
20
revised Showing differentiabililty at a particular point.
edited body
Jan
20
asked Showing differentiabililty at a particular point.
Dec
25
revised Initial conditioins for a recurrence relations
added 11 characters in body
Dec
25
comment Initial conditioins for a recurrence relations
@mathlove: I've added to the question.
Dec
25
revised Initial conditioins for a recurrence relations
added 78 characters in body
Dec
25
asked Initial conditioins for a recurrence relations
Nov
5
accepted Clarification of L'hospital's rule
Nov
5
accepted Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
Nov
2
comment Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
I'm not sure if what I did is right, but I got $\theta$ between $-\cos^{-1} r /2$ and $\cos^{-1} r/2$. I solved for $\theta$ in the equation $r=2\cos \theta$.
Nov
2
comment Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
Ok. as $-\pi /2 \le \theta \le \pi /2$, $ 0\le r \le 2\cos \theta$? I'm struggling to find the second part for when $r$ is between $0$ and $2$.
Nov
2
comment Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
ok. thanks. shouldn't the circle be $r= 2 \cos \theta$? What if I
Nov
2
comment Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
@TedShifrin: Yes!
Nov
2
comment Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
$\theta$ will lie between $-\pi/2$ and $\pi / 2$
Nov
2
comment Setting up double integrals in polar coordinates
I want to write the area enclosed by the disk as a double integral