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bio website facebook.com/aloiziomacedo
location Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
age 21
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Mathematics Student


Dec
9
awarded  Caucus
Dec
6
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
5
accepted How to visualize topological differences between $\mathbb{R}P^{2n}$ and $\mathbb{C}P^n$
Dec
3
answered F is the constant function
Dec
3
comment Good references on Riemannian Geometry
Thank you for helping! I checked out Petersen's. I didn't go thoroughly through the text, but I should say that I also like the "Definition - Theorem" format, which is not Petersen's apparently.
Dec
2
asked Good references on Riemannian Geometry
Nov
30
comment In war with exercise, any future for me?
Well, I think that (by making a BIG generalization), mathematicians can be divided in two groups (of course, there is a continuum between them, but that is not my point): Theory Builders, and Problem Solvers. But... any one of them you fit yourself in, you need the other. If you are a problem solver, you need theory to solve problems. If you are theory builder, you need exercises to check if you are understanding the theory well enough. I think there is no running from it. EDIT: And the two things are not really opposed, but rather interconnected.
Nov
29
comment What is the following property of inequality called?
Related: math.stackexchange.com/questions/300920/…
Nov
29
asked Why aren't those spaces diffeomorphic?
Nov
28
answered Is $\nabla$ a vector?
Nov
27
comment Why not differentiable manifolds that are not of class $C^1$
I briefly asked myself this question... but convinced myself that having something that has a "rate of change" which isn't continuous should be of low interest, when talking about differential geometry aspects. Maybe I was too flippant, though.
Nov
27
asked Exhaustion of a manifold by compacts
Nov
26
awarded  Guru
Nov
25
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
24
awarded  Mortarboard
Nov
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
24
comment $f: \mathbb{R} \to \mathbb{R} $ by $f(x) =\frac 1{1+x^2}$ is uniformly continuous on $\mathbb{R} $
More generally, every continuous function in $\mathbb{R}$ with limits at infinity is uniformly continuous.
Nov
24
answered Will it become impossible to learn math?
Nov
12
accepted Continuous function that has limit at infinity is uniformly continuous (another viewpoint)
Nov
12
answered Convergence of $a_n= \frac{n!}{n^n}$?