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Sep
8
suggested approved edit on How can an ordered pair be expressed as a set?
Sep
8
asked How to show that $\lim\limits_{x \to \infty} f'(x) = 0$ implies $\lim\limits_{x \to \infty} \frac{f(x)}{x} = 0$?
Aug
24
awarded  Organizer
Aug
24
revised Domain, Co-Domain & Range of a Function
added terminology tag
Aug
24
suggested approved edit on Domain, Co-Domain & Range of a Function
Aug
9
awarded  Teacher
Aug
9
awarded  Commentator
Aug
9
comment How do I prove the divergence of this series?
@Didier: Oh yeah, thanks for pointing that out!
Aug
9
comment How do I prove the divergence of this series?
@Asaf: Hmm, that's a good point. If the original problem was with $\frac{1}{\log log n}$, I guess my solution was overkill.
Aug
9
answered How do I prove the divergence of this series?
Jun
8
comment How does the parallelogram law imply the existence of an inner product for a given norm?
Thanks! I'm sorry I didn't find that when I searched for this question.
Jun
7
asked How does the parallelogram law imply the existence of an inner product for a given norm?
May
27
comment Understanding the Schwarz reflection principle
Thanks! That was the statement and construction given by the book, and while I could understand it, I didn't understand why my construction didn't work.
May
27
awarded  Scholar
May
27
comment Understanding the Schwarz reflection principle
Thank you! This was exactly my problem! I had assumed that $f(\overline{z})$ was holomorphic because it was a pretty "nice and simple" function. I just started studying complex analysis, so I had the definition of holomorphic memorized without much intution, but I understand the idea a lot better now!
May
27
accepted Understanding the Schwarz reflection principle
May
27
asked Understanding the Schwarz reflection principle
Jan
31
awarded  Supporter
Jan
16
comment Defining the determinant of linear transformations as multilinear alternating form
Aha thanks! I wonder how I overlooked the linearity of $T$. Hm... but I'm also wondering if this could be done in a way similar to the Steinitz exchange lemma. Suppose we order the $e_i$'s and $f_i$'s so that for all $0 \leq k \leq n$, $f_1, \ldots, f_k, e_{k+1}, \ldots, e_n$ span $V$. Then we could go from $vol(Te_1, \ldots, Te_n)/vol(e_1, \ldots, e_n)$ to $vol(Tf_1, \ldots, Tf_n)/vol(f_1, \ldots, f_n)$, replacing one vector at a time. (And the reason the ratio stays the same is because $T$ is linearity.)
Jan
16
awarded  Student