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8h
accepted Finding the volume of the area between two curves when rotated about the y-axis
1d
comment Finding the volume of the area between two curves when rotated about the y-axis
So are you referring to area above the $y=3x+2$ line, or below it (i.e. the area beneath $y=3x+2$ and above $x=0$)? If it's below the line, I don't understand why the area below $y=2$ is irrelevant
1d
comment Finding the volume of the area between two curves when rotated about the y-axis
But if I integrate from 2 to 8 for $y=3x+2$, what about the area underneath $y=2$?
1d
comment Finding the volume of the area between two curves when rotated about the y-axis
I'm having some trouble visualising how that would affect the volume :/ Do you know any programs that could map this into a 3D shape?
1d
asked Finding the volume of the area between two curves when rotated about the y-axis
2d
accepted Algebraic means for finding the range for $\frac{1}{f(x)}$
2d
asked Algebraic means for finding the range for $\frac{1}{f(x)}$
Sep
14
accepted Use of the second differential without an initial equation
Sep
14
comment Use of the second differential without an initial equation
D'oh! Thank you, that leads me to my answer :)
Sep
14
asked Use of the second differential without an initial equation
Sep
13
accepted Simple differentiation from first principles problem
Sep
13
awarded  Yearling
Sep
13
asked Simple differentiation from first principles problem
Aug
3
accepted The absolute difference between sum to infinity and sum to n terms
Jul
28
answered The absolute difference between sum to infinity and sum to n terms
Jul
28
comment The absolute difference between sum to infinity and sum to n terms
It's that simplification I'm having trouble with :)
Jul
28
asked The absolute difference between sum to infinity and sum to n terms
Jul
28
comment Finding common ratio from two sums
Sorry, I can't figure out how to get there. Can you point me in the right direction?
Jul
28
comment Finding common ratio from two sums
Isn't the sum to the first $n$ terms given by $S_n = \frac{a(1 - r^n)}{1-r}$? Not $r^{n-1}$...
Jul
28
comment Finding common ratio from two sums
Sorry, yes. The first three terms of the geometric series are $2$, $-\frac{1}{2}$, $\frac{1}{8}$.