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seen Mar 29 at 13:02

Mar
2
comment natural number reorder problem
thanks. i wish to get an opposite distance distribution compare to the list 1, 2, ..., N. For the list 1, 2, ..., N, the distances between i and i+j are larger when j is larger. Now I wish that the distance between i and i+j are smaller when j is larger. Is it possible to find such a list?
Mar
2
awarded  Commentator
Mar
2
comment natural number reorder problem
thanks. i mean maximize ALL the distance between elements i, i+1, elements i, i+2, ..., elements i, i+j, where 1<=i<=N, 1<=j<=N, and i+j<=N.
Mar
2
asked natural number reorder problem
Mar
27
revised Ask for help: the collide probability problem
added 131 characters in body
Mar
27
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. Sorry for my poor English and expression. I just mean if there is one molecule B which is neighboring to A (i.e., B_j is in the average distance of A and in this radial direction no other molecule is closer than B_j). On the other hand, do you think how should I describe my problem clearer by a mathematics language?
Mar
27
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. I have modified the problem again. According to your reminded, I say the boundary/neighbor molecule instead of the closest molecule. I wish this time "the number of transformed molecules is zero" is not true.
Mar
27
revised Ask for help: the collide probability problem
edited body
Mar
27
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
It's just an approximate number since the exact number is strictly determined by the location of every molecule. Is there any method to get the approximate number (or just as you said the expected value)?
Mar
27
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. Just as you said, the positions of the molecules are probabilistic, since we can't get the exact location of every molecule. However, they are uniform distributed in a global view. As a result, I just need the probabilistic number of molecules transformed in every step.
Mar
27
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. I don't think it is a physics question. I have modified my problem to an equalievent one, could you please help me to take a look at it?
Mar
27
revised Ask for help: the collide probability problem
added 313 characters in body
Mar
27
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. I mean the distribution of A and B, is their distribution in the space. Since farther two molecules, the probability of collision is smaller. On the other hand, after collision, the transformed A from B still near the A which collide to B, as a result, after several peroids, hundreds of molecule A are clustered into some points and the rate of transformation is slower than before. I want to know how the rate of transformation changes in the entire process.
Mar
26
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. Yes, just as you said, I want to know the quantities of transformed molecules B from A in every peroid, it is decided by the distribution of A and B. Assuming in the entire process the molecule A and B can be acted as the same objects when considering collision.
Mar
26
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly reply. What I mean is that we can suppose A and B have the same volume and the same quality, so that they have the same probability to collide each other. Initially A and B are distributed uniform, i.e., in any small space (of cause the space should be large enought that there are thousands of molecules in the space), the ratio of number A and B is equal to the ratio of total number of A and B. However, after several peroids of colliding, they are not uniform anymore.
Mar
26
comment Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Hi Joriki, thanks for your kindly comments. Suppose initially the phase spaces of A and B are uniform, i.e., the mixture of A and B is uniform. During the entire process, the motions of A and B are the same, which could lead to the phase spaces of A and B are not uniform.
Mar
26
revised Ask for help: the collide probability problem
added 114 characters in body
Mar
26
revised Ask for help: the collide probability problem
added 54 characters in body
Mar
26
asked Ask for help: the collide probability problem
Feb
1
awarded  Tumbleweed