Reputation
21,187
Next tag badge:
99/100 score
24/20 answers
Badges
9 52 147
Impact
~560k people reached

Oct
29
comment Let $F\subseteq K $ and $V$ is a vector space over $K$ with a basis. What is the basis of $V$ over $F$?
So... $K$ is a field with a basis $e_i$? Does that mean $K$ is also a vector space?
Oct
29
answered Assume G is a finite group and prove that the number of elements x in G s.t. $x^3=1$ is odd
Oct
28
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
22
revised Suppose $\lim \sup_{n \to \infty}a_n \le \rho$. Show $\lim \sup_{n \to \infty} a_n^{{(n-m)}/{n}} \le \rho$.
edited title
Oct
22
revised Proving that a complex function is analytic, and finding its power series
edited title
Oct
22
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
20
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
19
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
17
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
12
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
9
revised Limits of 2 variable functions
added 129 characters in body
Oct
9
revised Limits of 2 variable functions
rolled back to a previous revision
Oct
9
revised Limits of 2 variable functions
added 43 characters in body; edited title
Oct
3
comment Calculating $\int_\gamma \frac{1}{1+z^2}\,dz$
@Tom-Tom Great, thank you.
Oct
2
comment Calculating $\int_\gamma \frac{1}{1+z^2}\,dz$
What's a primitive function?
Oct
2
revised How to prove function $f(x,y)=\frac{1}{xy}$ is not uniformly continuous?
added 8 characters in body; edited title
Oct
2
comment How to prove function $f(x,y)=\frac{1}{xy}$ is not uniformly continuous?
Nicely done. ${}$
Sep
29
comment Branching points of the function $(z^2-1)^{2/3}$
Why are $\pm 1$ branch points? I looked up the definition and as far as I understand a critical point $z_0$ is called branch point it the winding number of a path around $f(z_0)$ is greater than one. In this case, $f(\pm 1) = 0$ but since there is no pole at $0$ it is not clear to me why the winding number around $0$ would not be $0$. What am I missing?
Sep
28
comment Showing that an inclusion is null homotopic
@morphic I don't remember.
Sep
28
comment finding a linear transformation
I might be missing something but is there any reason why you can't just define $\theta = \alpha \oplus \beta$?