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Jan
15
comment Difference between complete and closed set
@JonasMeyer Thank you.
Jan
14
revised Sigma algebra/Borel sigma algebra proof problem
Latex added.
Jan
14
revised Is $\mathbf{Q}(\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3}) = \mathbf{Q}(\sqrt{2}+\sqrt{3})$?
Tags edited.
Jan
14
comment I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
@JimConant Thanks Jim, that's right, it's a totally ordered set. Maybe you could suggest a better notation -- how are ordered lists usually denoted?
Jan
14
revised I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
edited body
Jan
14
comment I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
@Lmn6 Typo fixed.
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
14
revised I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
added 184 characters in body
Jan
13
awarded  Yearling
Jan
12
comment Difference between complete and closed set
@JonasMeyer Thank you! My confusion arose from the fact that I considered $\sqrt{2}$ a limit point of $\mathbb{Q}$ in $\mathbb{Q}$ I think. And as anon stated concisely. "A limit point of X in Y has to actually exist in Y.".
Jan
12
comment Difference between complete and closed set
@JonasMeyer So when Wikipedia writes "a set is closed if and only if it contains all of its limit points", then this is under the assumption that the space is a complete metric space? I'm asking because then the Wikipedia entry would be wrong.
Jan
12
revised Difference between complete and closed set
Tags edited and typo fixed.
Jan
12
revised Original works of great mathematician Évariste Galois
Accent aigu ajouté.
Jan
12
answered a question on transfinite recursion on $\mathbf{ON}$
Jan
12
comment I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
@John Yes, it helped me a lot, too : )
Jan
12
revised I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
Latex added.
Jan
12
answered I want to know why $\omega \neq \omega+1$.
Jan
12
comment Converting to partial fractions
I'd like to second that.
Jan
11
comment How to understand the regular cardinal?
According to the examples on Wikipedia the "easiest" example of a regular cardinal are the finite ordinals.
Jan
11
comment Looking for a proof of the completeness of $C^{n}[0,1]$.
@Kyle Glad I could help : )