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22h
comment Find the center of the symmetry group Sn.
@LSpice : $\;\;\;$ How so? $\:$ It seems like in those cases, the center will still be the trivial subgroup. $\hspace{.65 in}$
Aug
24
comment Topological spaces admitting an averaging function
@EricWofsey : $\:$ $\mathbb{R}^0$ is a closed manifold that admits a mean. $\;\;\;\;$
Aug
24
comment Specifying an arbitrary point on a manifold
Apparently, although there don't seem to be online references for that. $\;$
Aug
20
comment Conjecture about regular Borel measures and dense sets with no interior
No. $\;\;\;\;\;\;\; ([-1,\hspace{-0.03 in}0]\cap \mathbb{Q}) \: \cup \: ([1,\hspace{-0.04 in}2]-\mathbb{Q}) \;\;\;$ is a counterexample. $\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;$
Aug
7
revised Why does this elliptic quasilinear problem have a weak solution?
fixed title's grammar
Aug
4
comment How many uniform samples are needed to hit every element
duckduckgo.com/?q=coupon+collector+problem&ia=about $\;$
Aug
4
comment For any closed subset of $\mathbb{R}$ there is a sequence in $\mathbb{R}$ whose sequential limits is equal to the that subset
@AsafKaragila : $\;\;\;$ Yes, but it doesn't have to be a sequential limit of enumerations of countable sets $D$ such that $\: \overline{D} = A \;$. $\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;$
Aug
3
comment For any closed subset of $\mathbb{R}$ there is a sequence in $\mathbb{R}$ whose sequential limits is equal to the that subset
@AsafKaraglia : $\:$ That doesn't work for isolated points, and ever after dealing with that, one still needs to use that $\mathbb{R}$ is not sequentially compact. $\;\;\;\;$
Aug
3
asked Proving Richardson's theorem for constants
Aug
3
comment vercongent sequences
"if $A$ is empty, it is trivially included in any open ball", but there aren't necessarily any open balls. $\hspace{.6 in}$ ($\hspace{.03 in}X$ could also be empty.) $\;$
Aug
2
comment The relation x=1
$(2,\hspace{-0.03 in}2) \not\in R \;$
Aug
1
revised Why is the remainder uniformly distributed when 1,2,3,… are divided by an irrational number?
fixed title's grammar
Jul
29
comment Why does $ \int_0^1 \lceil { x\sin({1 \over x})} \rceil \,dx = 1 - \frac{\log(4)}{2\pi} $?
It looks like your inequality should be strict. $\;$
Jul
27
comment Explicit construction of a nonmeasurable set, where only the proof of correctness uses choice?
@Henning : $\;\;\;$ Solovay's model is not a model of ZFC, so a priori, he could hope "that the thing defined will in" all "models of" ZFC "be a nonmeasurable set." $\:$ (The Krivine result rules that out.) $\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;$
Jul
27
answered Explicit construction of a nonmeasurable set, where only the proof of correctness uses choice?
Jul
27
comment Proving that a function is Riemann Integrable
Ah, I now realize that there is an interpretation which would make your proof correct. $\hspace{1.34 in}$
Jul
27
comment Proving that a function is Riemann Integrable
I edited my answer. $\;$
Jul
27
revised Proving that a function is Riemann Integrable
added another non-proof
Jul
27
answered Proving that a function is Riemann Integrable
Jul
27
comment Proving that a function is Riemann Integrable
What does "we have s-ε0" mean? $\;$