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 Yearling
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Jun
3
accepted What is a bounded discrete random variable
Jun
3
comment What is a bounded discrete random variable
And this means that the normal random variable Z is unbounded?
Jun
2
asked What is a bounded discrete random variable
Apr
25
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
14
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
13
comment Case C: Euler's equation in Simmon's textbook
I've adjusted my work above to reflect what I learned from your comment. Am I understanding this properly?
Apr
13
revised Case C: Euler's equation in Simmon's textbook
added 1200 characters in body
Apr
12
asked Case C: Euler's equation in Simmon's textbook
Mar
26
asked Classification type of equilibrium point
Jan
5
awarded  Yearling
Nov
24
asked Why is SSE called unexplained variation
Aug
15
asked Examples of Lebesgue dominated convergence theorem
Jul
13
comment Folland, Chapter 1 Problem 17
Eric, nope, you have it incorrect. It might be because we're using different letters and it's getting you confused. Here is the definition, direct from Folland: If $\mu^*$ is an outer measure on $X$, a set $A\subset X$ is called $\mu^*$-measurable if $\mu^*(E)=\mu^*(E\cap A)+\mu^*(E\cap A^C)$ for all $E\subset X$. Now if I change my letters it would read: A set $E$ is called $\mu^*$-measurable if $\mu^*(A)=\mu^*(A\cap E)+\mu^*(A\cap E^C)$ for all $A\subset X$. Hope this helps.
Jul
13
comment Folland, Chapter 1 Problem 17
$B$ is the union of a countable number of disjoint $\mu^*$-measurable sets, so $B$ is measurable, meaning $\mu^*(E)=\mu^*(E\cap B)+\mu^*(E\cap B^C)$ for any $E\subset X$.
Jul
13
asked Folland, Chapter 1 Problem 17
Jul
12
answered Folland Proposition 1.13 Real Analysis, Second Edition
Jul
12
revised Folland Proposition 1.13 Real Analysis, Second Edition
edited title
Jul
12
asked Folland Proposition 1.13 Real Analysis, Second Edition
Jul
10
asked Holder's inequality and an infinite series question
Jul
9
comment Constructing a complete measure space
In your latest proof, why is $\mu(U\cup G)=0$?