111 reputation
6
bio website iqandreas.com
location Degerfors, Sweden
age 23
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen May 31 at 22:05

Developer with multiple languages under my belt; primarily ActionScript 3, but also includes PHP, Java, and JavaScript.

Just to be clear, I hate JavaScript: it's weakly typed, and its inheritance system is a joke. PHP isn't big on my list either. Yet, since the web uses them, I'm forced to work in them.


Mar
29
comment Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
@wendy.krieger That still isn't what I am referring to, you are talking about public key cryptography. What I am referring to is how user passwords are stored in a site's database; rather than store the password, a hash of the password is stored, and the password they actually typed in is forgotten by the server side. Later, when you want to validate a user's password, you hash the value they entered, and compare that to the hashed value stored in the database. I think this video explains that way hashing is used: youtube.com/watch?v=8ZtInClXe1Q
Mar
29
awarded  Informed
Mar
29
comment Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
@wendy.krieger I edited my question to clarify what I'm looking for, and neither part of your answer really fits what I seek.
Mar
29
revised Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
added 26 characters in body
Mar
29
comment Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
@JiK That is going to be limited by how much data is contained in the resulting hash. Just for demonstration purposes, two inputs that produce the same hash are fine so long as there are maybe a hundred possible different values they could result in. However, if there are only a handful of possible results, such as the suggested using mod 13 or mod 10, that is not good enough, and would only confuse the student.
Mar
29
comment Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
@wendy.krieger That's how it's used for files, however, one can just as easily (and developers do) hash a password to "hide" the original value. For all intents and purposes, the original value is "lost".
Mar
29
awarded  Editor
Mar
29
revised Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
Clarify question
Mar
28
awarded  Student
Mar
28
asked Is there a hashing algorithm that can be done on paper?
Mar
17
awarded  Quorum
Feb
16
comment Logic puzzle: Which octopus is telling the truth?
If you enjoyed this puzzle, may I shamelessly plug the Puzzling proposal in Area51?
Aug
17
awarded  Autobiographer
Jan
4
awarded  Supporter