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Jan
9
awarded  Supporter
Jan
6
awarded  Commentator
Jan
6
comment Linear map, polynomial
Argghh, how do I type a matrix?
Jan
6
comment Linear map, polynomial
Thx again, could the nullspace be correct now? Is it correct to convert my $T(P(x))$ to the matrix, $\mathbf{T(P(x))}=\begin{bmatrix} 0000\\0010\\0-2-46\\0020\\00012 \end{bmatrix}$ ?
Jan
6
revised Linear map, polynomial
added 159 characters in body
Jan
6
comment Linear map, polynomial
Ok Hagen thx, but what happens to the degree 4 polynomials? They just disappear or do I degrade them somehow?
Jan
6
comment Linear map, polynomial
Im sry, I dont understand endomorphism. The expression of T is as its written in the questionaire. But I realize now that it does produce degree 4 polynomials, which doesnt lie in our vectorspace. How should I interpret that? Ill look up endomorphism :)
Jan
6
asked Linear map, polynomial
Jan
6
awarded  Scholar
Jan
6
accepted Inner product, smallest distance
Jan
6
comment Inner product, smallest distance
Thx! I realize now that this wasn't the type of exercise I wanted to ask about. Although, Ive learned sth new! Satisfied.
Jan
6
awarded  Editor
Jan
6
revised Inner product, smallest distance
edited body
Jan
6
comment Inner product, smallest distance
Oh no, you are right. I mistyped it :( Ill edit...Thx!
Jan
6
comment Inner product, smallest distance
Aha ok, I had no idea. Never seen a forum in this format before. I appreciate your answer, but Ill wait and see then. The thing is, I believe that some of the questions of this type on my exam will be in such a form that I cant use your solution, so I need some more answers :) Thx again for replying, and telling me about the system of this site.
Jan
6
comment Inner product, smallest distance
What I meant by the matrix of the polynomial was, $(x,y)\begin{bmatrix} 2,1 \\ 1,3 \end{bmatrix}(x,y)^t$. Perhaps I cant say that this is a matrix of a polynomial?
Jan
6
comment Inner product, smallest distance
Thx Eric, I didnt think about the fact that $\mathbf{x}=\begin{bmatrix} x \\ 1-x \end{bmatrix}$. This was a much neater way to do it.
Jan
6
awarded  Student
Jan
6
comment Inner product, smallest distance
Thank you Michael, I will do that!
Jan
6
asked Inner product, smallest distance