735 reputation
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location Maryland, United States
age 46
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Jan 22 at 20:50

Scientist turned systems engineer by day, I enjoy recreational math, esp. mental approximations and properties related to the prime factorization of a number (e.g., # of divisors, powerful numbers, smooth numbers). I'm also interested when half-integers share a property of integers, such as Pronic numbers, which are essentially the squares of half-integers. For something else intriguing, check out the Sacks number spiral.


Nov
28
answered Trigonometry triangles
Nov
28
comment Lower bound for logarithm?
Since we were discussing bounds A "close to" 0, I assumed we were only interested in a bounding function for $x << 1$.
Nov
28
answered Continued fraction explanation
Nov
28
answered Lower bound for logarithm?
Nov
26
asked Can we determine which statements are incomplete due to Godel?
Nov
26
answered When proving a statement by induction, how do we know which case is the valid 'base'?
Nov
26
comment Prove that every practical number is either a power of two or a power of two times a non-trivial polygonal number
@PeterTaylor I will do it if you wish. I want more experience updating OEIS. Let me know. p.s. love the domain name, and those laser swords.
Nov
24
awarded  Quorum
Nov
24
answered Probability - rolling two dices and flipping one coin two times
Nov
24
comment Positively non-positive (from Brilliant.org) Whats wrong with my method?
@YanYau, note that although a single case is not sufficient to prove that an N works, a single counter-example is sufficient to prove that a given N doesn't work, since you were asked to prove a condition always holds.
Nov
24
comment Derivative word problem - $s''(t) = a$, i.e the acceleration is constant and $(1) [s'(t)]^2 = 2as(t)$
Note that the prior question asks you to show why the solution is not in that form, so you shouldn't be surprised that there is no 'c' in the new form you are given.
Nov
24
comment Proving for every odd number $x$, $x^2$ is always congruent to $1$ or $9$ modulo $24$
I think you should make it its own answer, as this seems to be the real issue with the OP's understanding, not squaring and reducing numbers.
Nov
24
revised Proving for every odd number $x$, $x^2$ is always congruent to $1$ or $9$ modulo $24$
typos
Nov
24
comment Number of ways to arrange $5$ a and $5$ b letter
As Andre says, how many places can the first 'a' go? The second? ... The fifth? But the 'a's are indistinguishable, so for each pattern we've produced, how many times did we create it by placing the 'a's in a different order? The end result will be what Adi wrote.
Nov
24
answered Differential Equations and Newtons method
Nov
24
answered Derivative word problem - $s''(t) = a$, i.e the acceleration is constant and $(1) [s'(t)]^2 = 2as(t)$
Nov
24
comment Is $x^2$ always congruent to $(y-x)^2$ modulo $y$? How could you prove the cases where its true?
that should be $-2xy$ in the expansion, luckily it doesn't change the conclusion.
Nov
24
answered Proving for every odd number $x$, $x^2$ is always congruent to $1$ or $9$ modulo $24$
Nov
23
comment Prove that every practical number is either a power of two or a power of two times a non-trivial polygonal number
@Jaycob, for the moment I was looking at lines of practical numbers for $x^2 \pm y$ or $P(x) \pm y$ (P being the pronic numbers), in a parallel to the patterns seen for primes in the Sacks number spiral. BTW, it was answering your other question that started me on the practical numbers and I haven't been able to give them up yet.
Nov
23
comment Twin Prime Powers
To the original question, since powers of three are so rare it is probably quickest to simply enumerate and test them, as I presume @MatthewConroy has done already up to $3^{41}$.