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awarded  Nice Question
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Jan
3
comment Infimum of two measures
In the last sentence, I think you mean the only possible $A$ that works would be $B^c$.
Jan
3
comment Infimum of two measures
Nice general argument.
Dec
31
accepted Infimum of two measures
Dec
31
revised Infimum of two measures
added 48 characters in body
Dec
31
asked Infimum of two measures
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Sep
24
comment Boolean algebras without atoms
You are right. I had missed that part. Nice proof.
Sep
24
comment Boolean algebras without atoms
I am not sure this proof works. The $y_{i,j}$ may not be all distinct, for different values of $i$. And similarly for the $w_{i,j}$. But there is no a priori guarantee that the equalities between the $y_{i,j}$ match exactly the equalities between the $w_{i,j}$. So it's not clear that $\pi$ is well defined.
Sep
6
comment nonisomorphic groups whose quotients are isomorphic
Like you say, subgroups can be embedded in all sorts of ways into other groups. So if $C$ and $C'$ are isomorphic but not exactly the same, it's a simple matter of modifying $A$ and $B$ and identifying elements in certain ways to make $C$ and $C'$ actually identical. See Ittay Weiss's answer for example.
Sep
6
answered nonisomorphic groups whose quotients are isomorphic
Sep
2
answered Non-isomorphic countable Boolean algebras
Jun
30
revised Show that $\langle G^+\rangle=G$ in a directed group
Subgroup was meant here