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Feb
16
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
4
revised Constrained optimization over vectors
added 117 characters in body
Sep
26
revised Constrained optimization over vectors
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Sep
25
revised Constrained optimization over vectors
edited title
Sep
25
revised Constrained optimization over vectors
edited title
Sep
25
asked Constrained optimization over vectors
Oct
6
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
14
comment Apparent paradox commuting this convolution: where is the mistake?
Thanks a lot, I see what you mean. If only $x$ and $r$ were also Gaussian, things would be a lot better. I grew up in Philly, please enjoy omnoming a cheesesteak for me.
Jul
14
accepted Apparent paradox commuting this convolution: where is the mistake?
Jul
14
comment Apparent paradox commuting this convolution: where is the mistake?
Thanks for the note-- I actually mean that it doesn't work for a Gaussian (I've tried massaging the Gaussian property that you're talking about to be able to reorder the operations). But good point about the frequency domain, I think that is the mistake.
Jul
14
asked Apparent paradox commuting this convolution: where is the mistake?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Feb
16
answered Pigeonhole Principle -
Feb
9
comment Using “we have” in maths papers
@MarcvanLeeuwen "We have 'one has'"
Feb
8
awarded  Benefactor
Jan
14
comment Splitting a sandwich and not feeling deceived
Nice! You used the invisible hand of the market to cut the sandwich.
Jan
10
comment Why are mathematical proofs that rely on computers controversial?
I also enjoy how democratized math is. I think it's difficult to draw the line between ourselves and tools we use. ME + PEN + NOTEBOOK feels close to ME, but ME + PEN + PAPER + GENIUS MATHEMATICIAN feels less. What about a calculator to avoid careless arithmetic errors? Maple / Mathematica? Perhaps sometimes it's elegant to use tools: perhaps the quote that "the best mathematician is a lazy one" is somehow akin to "the deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle." But even as I write this, I'm reminded that flying un-manned death robots are actually the deadliest weapons...
Jan
10
comment Why are mathematical proofs that rely on computers controversial?
@Shayne +1 I really agree that the most elegant part is often the narrowing of the solution space, but there are those of us who take great joy in the "last mile". The jump from the statement "It is possible to do this" to "I can do this in the 1 month with a normal computer" can also be a source of grand elegance. Methods like the FFT are beautiful in themselves, and are sometimes part of the engine that allows brute force to be practical for the last mile of a proof. In a way, it's narrowing the solution as well (in # steps rather than space). There is one mathematics, and it's everywhere!
Jan
9
awarded  Critic
Dec
15
awarded  Popular Question