1,531 reputation
825
bio website about:blank
location Berlin, Germany
age 19
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jul 16 at 0:07

I'm a highschool student from Germany interested in functional programming, especially Haskell.


Mar
8
comment How to prove that a polynomial of degree $n$ has at most $n$ roots?
@Moron: Okay. Thank you for this.
Mar
8
comment How to prove that a polynomial of degree $n$ has at most $n$ roots?
@Moron: It's a part of the fundamental theorem. Consider this question as answered.
Mar
8
comment How to prove that a polynomial of degree $n$ has at most $n$ roots?
@Moron: I'm not (yet) in university. This isn't homework. Just asking this as a part to proof my last question. I'm asking this because I didn't knew, that this is a fundamental theorem of algebra.
Mar
5
comment How to prove the equality $\sum_{j=0}^n (x)^j (-1)^{n-j} \left\{{n \atop j}\right\} = x^n$?
Is your $(x)^j$ the same as $x^\overline{j}?$
Mar
5
comment Equality of polynomials: formal vs. functional
@Harry Stern: Yes :)
Mar
5
comment Equality of polynomials: formal vs. functional
@Qiaochu Yuan $a_k, b_k \in \mathbb{C}$
Mar
4
comment Equality of polynomials: formal vs. functional
Sorry, formulated the question wrong.
Mar
4
comment Equality of polynomials: formal vs. functional
@Jason DeVito: $a_k$ and $b_k$ are just coefficients. They're independent of $x$.
Feb
23
comment Three non-coplanar lines in the 3D-space always have a fourth one that intersect them all?
This proof is the easiest to understand for me. Thank you.
Feb
13
comment Does the formula $\sqrt{ 1 + 24n }$ always yield prime?
Uhhh... That's difficult. Thanks for this link.
Feb
12
comment Does the formula $\sqrt{ 1 + 24n }$ always yield prime?
Changed. I thought it's very difficult or impossible to find a prime generating function which only yields primes. Can you give me an example?
Feb
12
comment How can I systematically find a solution to this problem?
That was my approach before. With the reposity formula for geometric sequences, you can even find a closed form for even / odd $n$. But I considered it uggly, as it's unusable if you can't spot such pattern.
Feb
12
comment How can I systematically find a solution to this problem?
Has this method a specific name?
Feb
12
comment How can I systematically find a solution to this problem?
That's cool. Thank you very much.
Feb
12
comment How can I systematically find a solution to this problem?
I'm a bit confused - can you explain the exact procedure on my example equation?
Feb
12
comment Three non-coplanar lines in the 3D-space always have a fourth one that intersect them all?
Actually, this was not homework or something else. I thought about this in context of another problem and found out, that this can be false if the lines might be coplanar. But in this case I can't think of any reason why there should be no such fourth line. This is a good idea for a proof. I'm going to think about it.
Jan
2
comment Suggest quicker method for finding rate percent per annum
@Ross Millikan: You first have to trigger $\TeX$-Mode by a $, and finish it with another. $150\$$ becomes $150\$.$
Jan
2
comment Suggest quicker method for finding rate percent per annum
@Debanjan Sorry. Was just a bit feeling like Hey, this guy want's us to solve his homework.
Jan
2
comment On profit loss (II)
No upvote because you tell him the final result. This is probably homework and should teach something.
Jan
2
comment Solving $x$, $y$ and $z$
You can use $\TeX$ markup to beautify your equations by putting $-marks around them.