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 Inquisitive
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Aug
23
accepted The space of homeomorphisms of the closed unit interval
Aug
23
asked Closure of Schubert cell is the Schubert variety
Aug
16
revised The space of homeomorphisms of the closed unit interval
edited title
Aug
16
asked The space of homeomorphisms of the closed unit interval
Jun
23
revised Example: Krull dimension 1 but not a PID
correction
Jun
23
accepted Example: Krull dimension 1 but not a PID
Jun
22
awarded  Inquisitive
Jun
22
asked Example: Krull dimension 1 but not a PID
Jun
15
accepted Path components of quotient space
Jun
14
comment Path components of quotient space
Mmm, as you say, one direction is clear... the other is more interesting.
Jun
14
asked Path components of quotient space
May
11
comment Identity of tensor products over an algebra
This answer sounds promising. Can you please elaborate upon it? It seems like you're appealing to certain universal properties I might not be familiar with.
May
11
comment Identity of tensor products over an algebra
Yes, sorry I forgot to mention that.
May
11
revised Identity of tensor products over an algebra
added 1 character in body
May
11
revised Identity of tensor products over an algebra
added 34 characters in body
May
11
asked Identity of tensor products over an algebra
Feb
12
revised Quotient of a category by equality in Grothendieck group
edited title
Feb
10
asked Quotient of a category by equality in Grothendieck group
Dec
14
comment Is it possible to find the $n$th digit of $\pi$ (in base $10$)?
If you believe that we are free to define the values of a function $\mathbb{N} \to \{ 0, \dots , 9 \}$, then you already believe the function exists. In fact, your belief in the function is implicit in the first indented equations. Just because you can't list the function's values (either because you don't know them or you don't have enough time) doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
Dec
14
comment Is it possible to find the $n$th digit of $\pi$ (in base $10$)?
There's nothing wrong with defining a function using words, $f(n) = n$th digit of $\pi$. So certainly there is a function for what you want. Perhaps you're asking for a formula -- but then again you mentioned you don't mind whether we can "explicitly state it". So it's not clear what you're after.