stephen

Unregistered less info
106 reputation
6
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Jan 11 '13 at 21:34

Dec
11
comment How to know a function is in $L^p$.
I am not sure to see why we get what we want. We don't know anything about $m(\{x | f(x)^p > t\}$. It seems to me that you have only proven the well-known identity $\int g(x) = \int m(\{x | g(x) > t\}$ for any function $g$.
Dec
11
revised How to know a function is in $L^p$.
added 200 characters in body
Dec
11
asked How to know a function is in $L^p$.
Dec
11
accepted On the integrability of some functions
Dec
11
asked On the integrability of some functions
Dec
11
comment On an identity about integrals
I see. Thank you, I did not realize that!
Dec
10
comment On an identity about integrals
Thanks! The way you put it is really intuitive!
Dec
10
accepted On an identity about integrals
Dec
10
awarded  Scholar
Dec
10
accepted On one property of the Lebesgue Measure
Dec
10
awarded  Editor
Dec
10
revised On one property of the Lebesgue Measure
added 16 characters in body
Dec
10
comment On one property of the Lebesgue Measure
@Nate. I am not sure I see how the answers address this question. What do you mean by taking complements?
Dec
10
comment On one property of the Lebesgue Measure
@Jacob. $I$ is an arbitrary measurable subset of $[0,1]$.
Dec
10
asked On one property of the Lebesgue Measure
Dec
10
awarded  Student
Dec
10
asked On an identity about integrals