142 reputation
4
bio website
location San Mateo, CA
age 41
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Jan 15 at 17:38

Sr. statistician at Complete Genomics, Inc., Mountain View, CA.


Jan
15
awarded  Critic
Jan
15
comment Splitting a sandwich and not feeling deceived
Not sure why this choice is getting so many up-votes. It is not envy-free, and it does not particularly ensure an even split. In fact, the author himself says that the first person believes he has AT LEAST 1/nth of the sandwich. This implicitly guarantees that the remaining folks have AT MOST 1/nth of the sandwich. The likelihood, especially after doing this twice over, of everyone getting 1/nth is low. In fact, I can imagine my kids complaining that this just ensures the kid with the quickest / loudest mouth gets the largest piece.
Nov
18
comment Suggestions for complicated math concepts that a child can understand
@littleO Thanks! I will check out some local groups. We're in the Bay Area, so there are plenty, I'm sure. Even at his school. But now I'm thinking maybe I just set something like this up with him & his friends.
Nov
18
comment Suggestions for complicated math concepts that a child can understand
Thanks! We already have Zometool. I'm happy getting & using toys with him, but he actually wants something a bit more in the realm of "solving": puzzles, and puzzle-like things, etc. So I'm looking for ways to encourage creative problem solving.
Nov
16
asked Suggestions for complicated math concepts that a child can understand
Dec
6
comment “Fun” question: anyone know why $e$ (Euler's Number) was chosen for wave functions?
Thanks for the "double edit"! The comment regarding the solution for a drum and the connection between ALL complex exponentials and circles is great! I guess my problem was that I was intuitively seeing what you wrote elegantly & explicitly, but not recognizing that the real "magic" is in recognizing that complex exponentials are "magically circular". That's easier for me to get my head around, since it is simply the easiest / simplest way to write a circle as a function: i^x is itself circular, where x is any real number. Thanks so much!!
Dec
6
awarded  Scholar
Dec
6
accepted “Fun” question: anyone know why $e$ (Euler's Number) was chosen for wave functions?
Dec
4
comment “Fun” question: anyone know why $e$ (Euler's Number) was chosen for wave functions?
Thanks to whomever made all of the equations look prettier! Now I know how to add equations properly in this forum.
Dec
4
comment “Fun” question: anyone know why $e$ (Euler's Number) was chosen for wave functions?
Hi, yes, I think you are correct. But my question was more fundamental as to WHY this is the case? No definitions of e that I have run across ever use trigonometry to define the number. So how does it "magically" also have this incredibly useful trigonometric property? Doesn't that seem downright crazy to anyone else?
Dec
4
awarded  Student
Dec
4
awarded  Supporter
Dec
4
asked “Fun” question: anyone know why $e$ (Euler's Number) was chosen for wave functions?