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5h
asked Check if $n=m^2$ in $\mathbb F_q$
Apr
19
reviewed Approve Simple homotopy construction
Apr
17
revised how to calculate number of points on an Elliptic curve over prime field? suggest any best method
added 3 characters in body
Apr
5
comment Complexity of $\gcd$ algorithm
@BrianM.Scott Thank you very much.
Apr
5
asked Complexity of $\gcd$ algorithm
Apr
5
reviewed Approve Interception Solid
Apr
4
comment Creating random numbers matching mean and standard deviation
For some reason, when reading the question I presumed he was asking for a normal distribution. I don't know why...
Apr
4
answered Creating random numbers matching mean and standard deviation
Apr
4
reviewed No Action Needed Creating random numbers matching mean and standard deviation
Apr
4
reviewed No Action Needed Show that no non-trivial open set in $\mathbb{R}^n$ has measure zero in $\mathbb{R}^n$
Apr
4
reviewed Approve Integral of $\frac{\sin x}{1+\sin^2x}$ from 0 to $\pi/2$
Apr
3
reviewed Approve Second moment of a PGF and relation to expectation
Apr
3
asked Existence of a number under Artin's conjecture
Apr
2
reviewed Approve Integration Question
Mar
30
comment circle as polar coordinates
@snowman There is indeed no answer. In mathematics the method is usually problem-dependent. From my point of view, what I did is more straightforward, as I'm just calculating the integral, of course a lot of times you solve integrals by doing changes of variables that are not simple isometries such as a translation-rotation. You just have to look in each case which is the best method. In this particular case the integrand is just $r$ in polar coordinates, so trying to evaluate the area of integration in those coordinates seemed to be a better option.
Mar
30
comment circle as polar coordinates
@snowman What you do is equivalent to translating the circle (and the function) to the left so the circle is centered at the origin. That should give the same result. What I did was just evaluate the function in the area in which we're integrating.
Mar
30
comment circle as polar coordinates
@snowman I edited the answer with further details about that.
Mar
30
revised circle as polar coordinates
added 340 characters in body
Mar
30
answered circle as polar coordinates
Mar
24
comment About this congruence implication
you mean when $X=0$?, then it's just Fermat's little theorem.