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seen Dec 22 '12 at 9:57

Dec
15
awarded  Scholar
Dec
15
comment Finding a normalization constant
Yes, my previous comment is not clear (I was aware that the outer product is equivalent to a sum in the exponent). Anyway, it really looks that I will not find a nice solution. Thx.
Dec
15
accepted Finding a normalization constant
Dec
15
comment Finding a normalization constant
@joriki Actually, the outer product is what bothers me.
Dec
15
awarded  Commentator
Dec
15
comment Finding a normalization constant
@joriki Hmm thx, though, I can't get a closed solution. The indices confuse me :(
Dec
15
comment Finding a normalization constant
@Marek: Yes, I have tried that, and it's really not pretty. I thought that maybe there is a nice trick that I misses.
Dec
15
revised Finding a normalization constant
added 3 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Finding a normalization constant
@joriki: Yes, you right. Thx
Dec
12
revised Is this a correct way of thinking of Fourier transforms
Latex edit......
Dec
12
comment Is this a correct way of thinking of Fourier transforms
I really think that en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_transform will answer all your questions.
Dec
12
suggested approved edit on Is this a correct way of thinking of Fourier transforms
Dec
12
comment Find The value of $a,b,c$.
What you wrote is not the piecewise version (sinx)..
Dec
11
comment What does $\forall$ mean?
It means : "for all"
Dec
11
revised When to use $f(x)=Ce^{kx}$ vs $f(x)=Ca^{kx}$?
Editing the title in Latex...
Dec
11
suggested approved edit on When to use $f(x)=Ce^{kx}$ vs $f(x)=Ca^{kx}$?
Dec
11
asked Finding a normalization constant
Dec
8
comment Calculating probability of some event using geometric considerations
@fedja, I assume that $v\neq 0$. Moreover, $v$ is a perturbed of $AU$. Thx for the correction.
Dec
8
revised Calculating probability of some event using geometric considerations
deleted 1163 characters in body
Dec
7
answered $f(x+2)−f(x)=(6x+4)^2$ and $f(0)=−16$. Find $f(5)$