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accepted Transition density and distribution: (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process)
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answered Transition density and distribution: (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process)
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comment Transition density and distribution: (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process)
Useless means not helpful, you should know that.
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comment Transition density and distribution: (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process)
Please refrain from useless unconstructive comments
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answered Solve $x^2 + 10 = 15$
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comment Partial Derivative of an Integral
Hi, You can't write partial derivatives with respect to BM. Only differentials are defined in BM, meaning it makes sense to talk about dZ=f(t)dB but does not make sense to talk about dZ/dB (or partials). Because derivative is a limit. It's for the same reason that BM is not differentiable as if you could write dZ/dB then we know dB/dZ=1/(dz/dB) which is not defined. It is important to differentiate between derivative and differential in stochastic calculus.