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1d
revised Prove that $ ax^2+bx+c=0 $ has at least one root in $(0,1)$ if $10a+12b+15c=0$
re tagging......
1d
suggested approved edit on Prove that $ ax^2+bx+c=0 $ has at least one root in $(0,1)$ if $10a+12b+15c=0$
2d
awarded  Caucus
2d
comment Limit as x goes to infinity of (50)(cosx)^3/(x^2+10)
You multiplied the numerator by $x$ but divided the denominator by $x$.
2d
revised Limit as x goes to infinity of (50)(cosx)^3/(x^2+10)
latexification
2d
suggested approved edit on Limit as x goes to infinity of (50)(cosx)^3/(x^2+10)
2d
revised Real roots of an nth order polynomial
latexification
2d
suggested approved edit on Real roots of an nth order polynomial
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
20
comment What is $f$? Finding where a function converges pointwise?
@Examin5days, you can ask it as a new question, but, briefly, show that every interval around $0$ contains a tail of the sequence $f_n(x)$ ($\forall x\in[0,1)$) i.e. that no matter how small a positive number $\varepsilon$ you pick, you can find some large $m$ such that $f_n(x)<\varepsilon\quad\forall n>m$.
Jun
20
comment What is $f$? Finding where a function converges pointwise?
@Examin5days, $[0,1)$ means the interval $[0,1]$ except for the single point $1$. That's the interval on which $f_n\to0$.
Jun
20
comment What is $f$? Finding where a function converges pointwise?
Fair enough. Hopefully they'll both help future readers, as well.
Jun
20
comment What is $f$? Finding where a function converges pointwise?
I don't see what this adds to my preexisting answer. (Half-kidding. I know you didn't see mine before posting yours, as mine predated yours by merely eleven seconds; so I'm not suggesting you should not have posted your answer. That said, now that you have seen mine, might I suggest deletion as a duplicate?)
Jun
20
answered What is $f$? Finding where a function converges pointwise?
Jun
2
awarded  Good Question
Mar
28
revised Poles (and order of) of $(\cosh(1/(z-\pi)))^2$ and Residue at $z=\pi$
latexification
Mar
28
suggested approved edit on Poles (and order of) of $(\cosh(1/(z-\pi)))^2$ and Residue at $z=\pi$
Mar
27
revised Is sin 1/x Riemann integrable
more clearly indicate the sinend (to coin a word)