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Apr
10
comment Why are there so many primes in the convergents of Pi?
...and of course, the convergents thus produced will always be in lowest terms.
Apr
10
comment In a right triangle, can $a+b=c?$
Since nobody apparently brought it up: look up the triangle inequality.
Apr
7
comment Is the catenary the trajectory of anything?
Then you'll want to see Stan Wagon actually riding his square-wheeled bicycle. ;)
Apr
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
7
revised Can the GM-AM inequality fail on a digital computer?
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Apr
7
comment Is the catenary the trajectory of anything?
That's certainly your choice to make, but then "trajectory" does not mean what you imply it means.
Apr
7
answered Is the catenary the trajectory of anything?
Apr
7
comment Is the catenary the trajectory of anything?
Wagon and Hall, in their paper, show that a straight line "wheel" can "roll" (in a sense defined in the paper) on a catenary "road"; the polygonal case is a slight modification of this. Have a look at their paper if you're interested. Nevertheless, I do not think it is an answer to the question, as the catenary is not really the locus here.
Apr
7
awarded  Good Question
Apr
6
comment How to connect two tilted lines with a sigmoid curve?
The simplest solution I can think of is to use a Hermite cubic, and matching function values and slopes at the two endpoints.
Apr
5
comment Blowing Up a Circle To a Hemisphere?
Look up the Lambert azimuthal projection.
Apr
5
revised What is this type of math notation called? (+ 4 5)
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Apr
4
revised What is this type of math notation called? (+ 4 5)
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Apr
4
revised Is there a sequence with an uncountable number of accumulation points?
added 3 characters in body; edited title
Apr
1
revised What is the difference between the three types of logarithms?
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Mar
27
comment Is there such a thing as backwards sigma?
It depends. One often sees the convention that the empty sum is assumed when the upper limit is less than the lower one.
Mar
25
comment How to make analytic continuation and compute imaginary part
Then $k(x)$ is going off the unit interval somewhere. Why not look at a plot of it to help you see?
Mar
25
comment How to make analytic continuation and compute imaginary part
What problem? It should be real there, no?
Mar
25
comment How to make analytic continuation and compute imaginary part
There's nothing to worry about if your modulus is within $[0,1)$, as I said. You will only deal with complex results for moduli outside that range. That's why I told you to look at how $k(x)$ behaves.
Mar
25
revised The Complex Logarithm and Complex Integration
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